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Magnitude 7.1 quake hits off Peru, killing at least 1

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Magnitude 7.1 quake hits off Peru, killing at least 1

The Associated Press
This photo released by Andina Agency shows residents in Chala, Peru, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, after an earthquake struck the area. The powerful earthquake struck off Peru's coast early Sunday, tumbling adobe homes in small, rural towns, officials said. (Andina Agency via AP)

A powerful earthquake struck off Peru's coast early Sunday, tumbling adobe homes in small, rural towns, killing at least one person and leaving dozens injured, officials said.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the early morning quake had a magnitude of 7.1 and was centered 25 miles (40 kilometers) from Acari in the Arequipa department of southwestern Peru.

The quake jolted people awake as far away as capital city of Lima, some 350 miles (560 kilometers) from Acari, blocked some roads, collapsed adobe homes in several towns and left at least one supermarket a jumble of fallen crackers boxes and soda bottles.

Arequipa Gov. Yamila Osorio said a 55-year-old man killed when he was crushed by a fallen rock and the National Civil Defense Institute said at least 57 people were injured — 23 of them in Chala district, a coastal area dependent on fishing and mining that is popular with tourists.

Photographs posted on social media showed evacuated tourists sitting outside one hotel before dawn.

President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski said on Twitter he was in route to the affected region to "verify the magnitude of the damage and send the needed humanitarian aid."

The U.S. Pacific Tsunami Warning Center initially warned of that hazardous waves could hit Peru and Chile, but later stated there was no longer any tsunami threat from the quake.

The quake came four days before Pope Francis was set to arrive in Peru.

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World

Egypt: 2 presidential hopefuls take aim at el-Sissi’s rule

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Egypt: 2 presidential hopefuls take aim at el-Sissi's rule

The Associated Press
FILE – In this Aug. 26, 2015 file photo, Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, center, reviews honor guards, as he takes part in a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of Unknown Soldier in Moscow, Russia. Two hopefuls have launched their presidential campaigns with a barrage of criticism of general-turned-president Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi's rule. El-Sissi has yet to formally announce whether he would contest the March 26-28, 2018 election, but he is virtually certain to contest and win another four-year term in office. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev, Pool, File)

Barely a week after authorities set a date for Egypt's presidential elections, two hopefuls have launched their campaigns with criticism of general-turned-president Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi's rule, with one promising to end "repression" if elected and the other claiming the incumbent is establishing a dictatorship.

El-Sissi has yet to formally announce whether he will run in the March 26-28 election, but he is virtually certain to contest and win another four-year term in office. He said in October he would decide after he sees voters' feedback on his track record over the past four years.

On Sunday, he announced on his Twitter account a conference to be held later this week in which "we will together review the journey of success." He was alluding to last week's announcement by his office that he would field questions from among those submitted by Egyptians online.

Neither of the two presidential hopefuls — prominent rights lawyer Khaled Ali and former lawmaker Mohammed Anwar Sadat — pose a serious challenge to el-Sissi's chances of re-election, but both appear willing to take advantage of the opportunity to air scathing criticism of his rule during an election season.

Sadat, nephew of Egypt's late leader Anwar Sadat, has posted a promotional video on social media networks in which he touts himself as capable of restoring "people's rule" and bringing an end to "corruption" and "oppression."

"They say Egypt is a quasi-state and that we are very, very poor," Sadat said in a voiceover, referring to two el-Sissi phrases that have been widely criticized as too harsh. "It's time we said enough to corruption, to oppression and misrepresentation. People can if given a chance," he said.

Thrown out of parliament last year amid allegations he leaked official documents to foreign diplomats, Sadat went on to outline what he intends to do if elected, which apparently includes reforming domestic and foreign policies, but he offered no specifics or how he would finance those measures.

Criticism of el-Sisi by Ali, the rights lawyer, was more direct and focused on the difficulties of running against an incumbent who commands vast resources, from a loyal media to state institutions.

He bemoaned that he was entering a race "knowing that those who rule this nation cannot accommodate integrity … Yes, we have taken on a battle that some see as impossible to win, not because of the strength of our rival, but because of the injustices in the conditions of the competition, its circumstances and context."

"We chose this path so that no one comes one day and says 'where was this generation when they were building a dictatorship?'" he told reporters Thursday.

Besides Ali and Sadat, the lineup of hopefuls include Egypt's former chief of staff, Sami Annan, who on Thursday posted on his Facebook account that his party has nominated him to run. Two former generals — him and el-Sissi — could therefore now potentially run against each other. Such a contest could undermine the appearance of a united front for a proud military establishment which has produced all but two of the country's presidents since the early 1950s.

But it' still early days before it is known whether any of the candidates will be eligible to run.

Under the constitution, any would-be candidate must gather formal "recommendations" from at least 20 elected members of parliament, or alternatively 25,000 recommendations from voters, with a minimum of 1,000 each from 15 of Egypt's 29 provinces.

Most lawmakers have already recommended el-Sissi, who has led a heavy crackdown since 2013 that has jailed thousands of opponents, mainly Islamists but also secular activists, including many of those involved in the 2011 uprising that toppled longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak.

Under his rule, street protests are banned, human rights groups have been placed under severe restrictions and several rights campaigners have been banned from foreign travel or had their assets frozen. Many critics in the media have been silenced. He has also been trying to revive the battered economy and brought a level of security to the streets not seen since the 2011 uprising.

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Health

Recall of French baby milk products extended to 83 countries

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Recall of French baby milk products extended to 83 countries

The Associated Press
The logo of Groupe Lactalis is seen as Head of Communication & External Relations, Michel Nalet attends a press conference in Paris, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018. French President Emmanuel Macron has criticized French diary giant Lactalis after major supermarkets admitted this week that baby food recalled over fears of salmonella contamination still made it onto French shelves. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

The head of French dairy company Lactalis says that a recall of baby milk products because of a salmonella scare has been extended to 83 countries from around 30.

In an interview with French weekly Le Journal du Dimanche, the president of Lactalis, Emmanuel Besnier, said that more than 12 million boxes of infant milk products are now concerned. They represent all lots from the Lactalis factory in Craon, northwest France, where the salmonella bacteria was discovered in December.

The move comes after Besnier met Friday with France's economy minister — and a bungled recall operation whose responsibility remains unclear.

The paper said 35 babies were diagnosed with salmonella in France, one in Spain and a possible case in Greece.

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Source – abcnews.go.com

Entertainment

Sam Rockwell drops f-bomb on ‘Saturday Night Live’

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Sam Rockwell drops f-bomb on 'Saturday Night Live'

Twitter/nbcsnl
Actor Sam Rockwell on "Saturday Night Live" on Jan. 13, 2018.

The Twittersphere lit up Saturday night after Sam Rockwell accidentally dropped the F-bomb during a "Saturday Night Live" sketch.

In the eyebrow-raising sketch, guest host Rockwell plays a science teacher in a lab with a pair students.

One of the students, played by cast member Mikey Day, can't seem to grasp the task at hand, so Rockwell's character says to the boy, "You can't be this f—— stupid."

The subsequent Mountain Time and Central Time airings of "SNL" were expletive-free.

Rockwell never breaks out of character — nor does Day or Cecily Strong, who plays the other student — but Rockwell does immediately cover his mouth after uttering the profanity.

A rep for "Saturday Night Live" declined to comment on Rockwell's slip of the tongue. ABC News has also sought comment from the actor's publicist.

Yow! Sam Rockwell just dropped the f-bomb live on @nbcsnl – on live coast to coast TV! pic.twitter.com/mHGWxN7jw7

— Brian Steinberg (@bristei) January 14, 2018

Rockwell isn't the only one to drop the F-bomb on "Saturday Night Live."

Guest host Kristen Stewart said the expletive last year.

In 2012, guest host Samuel L. Jackson said both "f—" and "bull—-."

And in 2009, cast member Jenny Slate said the F-word during a sketch. It was her first season with the show. She was fired after the conclusion of the season.

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Source – abcnews.go.com

World

Pope: It’s a sin if fear makes us hostile to migrants

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Pope: It's a sin if fear makes us hostile to migrants

The Associated Press
A family walks on the altar in front of Pope Francis on the occasion of a Mass on the world day for migrants and refugees, in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Pope Francis has defined hostility and rejection of refugees and migrants as sin, encouraging people to overcome their "fully comprehensible" fears that these new arrivals might "disturb the established order" of local communities.

At his invitation, several thousand migrants, refugees and immigrants from 49 countries joined Francis at Mass in St. Peter's Basilica on Sunday, a day the Catholic Church dedicated to the issues and contributions of those who leave homelands in hope of a better life.

New arrivals must "know and respect the laws, the culture and the traditions of the countries that take them in," he said. Local communities must "open themselves without prejudices to their rich diversity, to understand the hopes and potential of the newly arrived as well as their fears and vulnerabilities."

"It is not easy to enter into another culture, to put oneself in the shoes of people so different from us, to understand their thoughts and their experiences," Francis said.

"As a result, we often refuse to encounter the other and raise barriers to defend ourselves. Local communities are sometimes afraid that the newly arrived with disturb the established order, will 'steal' something they have long labored to build up."

Similarly, he said, newcomers also are afraid: "of confrontation, judgment, discrimination, failure."

"These fears are legitimate, based on doubts that are fully comprehensible from a human point of view," Francis continued in his homily.

"Having doubts and fears is not a sin," the pope said. "The sin is to allow these fears to determine our responses, to limit our choices, to compromise respect and generosity, to feed hostility and rejection."

Francis elaborated: "The sin is to refuse to encounter the other, the different, the neighbor," instead of seeing it as a "privileged opportunity" to encounter God.

In his almost five-year-old papacy, Francis has stressed the Catholic church's mission to welcome vulnerable and marginalized people. His focus comes as wealthier countries, including several European Union nations and the U.S., are intent on increasing physical or legal barriers to migrants.

Later, greeting about 25,000 people in St. Peter's Square, Francis advocated responding to the migrations that "today are a sign of our times" in four ways: "welcome, protect, promote and integrate" migrants.

———

Frances D'Emilio is on Twitter at www.twitter.com/fdemilio

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World

Turkey vows to attack Kurdish enclave in Syria within ‘days’

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Turkey vows to attack Kurdish enclave in Syria within 'days'

The Associated Press
Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gestures to supporters of his ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP), at a rally in Bingol, eastern Turkey, Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018. Erdogan has said Turkey will oust Kurdish militants from Afrin, northern Syria, as the military shelled the area from across the border. Turkey considers the YPG a terror group and an extension of the Kurdish insurgency within its own borders. (Pool Photo via AP)

Turkey's president says it will launch a military assault on a Kurdish enclave in northern Syria "in the coming days."

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Sunday the operation against the Afrin enclave will aim to "purge terror" from his country's southern border.

Afrin is controlled by a Kurdish militia known as the YPG, which Turkey views as a terror group and an extension of the Kurdish insurgency raging in its southeast.

Erdogan said the new operation would be an extension of Turkey's 2016 incursion into northern Syria, which was aimed at combatting the Islamic State group and stemming the advance of U.S.-backed Kurdish forces. Turkish troops are stationed in rebel-held territory on both sides of Afrin.

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TV

‘SNL’ Tackles Trump’s “Racist” Immigration Comments on “Weekend Update”

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'SNL' Tackles Trump's "Racist" Immigration Comments on "Weekend Update"

'Saturday Night Live'

"My job is to make jokes about the news, but Trump saying something racist isn't exactly news anymore," Michael Che said on the segment.

Host Sam Rockwell was not the only one who got to curse on NBC's Saturday Night Live over the weekend.

"The book Fire and Fury, a salacious exposé of the Trump White House, was released last week, and this week the sequel wrote itself," Colin Jost joked to open the "Weekend Update" segment of the show. "During an Oval Office meeting, Trump attacked protections for immigrants from African countries that he called 's-holes,'" he explained. "That's what NBC asked us to say, by the way, 's-hole' — even though the president can say 'shithole.' Oops."

Continued Jost, "I feel bad for parents with young children — every word you tell them not to say, they can say [back], 'But the president gets to say it!'" He also pointed out that Trump made the comment right before Martin Luther King, Jr. Day: "It's like pounding a case of beer before rehab. Now I'm just worried about what he's going to say the day before Passover."

"Weekend Update" co-host Michael Che added in his thoughts: "Can I be honest? When someone asks me, 'Did you hear what Donald Trump called Haiti and Africa?' I was like, 'Oh boy, did it start with an 'n?' But then I heard what he said, and I was like, 'That's it?' I've said that about countries for not having a CVS. Here's the thing: My job is to make jokes about the news, but Trump saying something racist isn't exactly news anymore."

During a meeting with lawmakers earlier this week about a proposed bipartisan deal on immigration, the president reportedly questioned why the U.S. would want to admit more people from "shithole countries." The deal would have changed rules affecting immigrants from Africa, El Salvador and Haiti.

Saturday Night Live
Read the full article – Hollywoodreporter.com

TV

‘SNL’ Tackles Trump’s “Racist” Immigration Comments on Weekend Update

weekend_update

'SNL' Tackles Trump's "Racist" Immigration Comments on Weekend Update

"My job is to make jokes about the news, but Trump saying something racist isn't exactly news anymore," Michael Che said on the segment.

Host Sam Rockwell was not the only one who got to curse on SNL tonight.

"The book Fire and Fury, a salacious expose of the Trump White House, was released last week, and this week the sequel wrote itself," Colin Jost joked to open the Weekend Update segment of the show. "During an Oval Office meeting, Trump attacked protections for immigrants from African countries that he called 's-holes,'" Jost explained. "That's what NBC asked us to say, by the way, 's-hole' even though the president can say 'shithole.' Oops."

He continued, "I feel bad for parents with young children — every word you tell them not to say, they can say [back], 'But the president gets to say it!'" He also pointed out that Trump made the comment right before Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. "It's like pounding a case of beer before rehab. Now I'm just worried about what he's going to say the day before Passover."

Jost's fellow host Michael Che added in his thoughts, too. "Can I be honest? When someone asks me, 'Did you hear what Donald Trump called Haiti and Africa?' I was like, 'Oh boy, did it start with an 'n?' But then I heard what he said, and I was like, 'That's it?' I've said that about countries for not having a CVS. Here's the thing. My job is to make jokes about the news, but Trump saying something racist isn't exactly news anymore."

During a meeting with lawmakers earlier this week about a proposed bipartisan deal on immigration, the president reportedly questioned why the United States would want to admit more people from "shithole countries." The deal would have changed rules affecting immigrants from Africa, El Salvador and Haiti.

Saturday Night Live
Read the full article – Hollywoodreporter.com