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Czech highway closed amid heavy snow, multiple car crashes

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Czech highway closed amid heavy snow, multiple car crashes

The Associated Press
Firefighters check damaged trucks on the D1 motorway near Vetrny Jenikov, 100 kilometres (62 miles) South East of Prague on Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018. The main Czech motorway is blocked in both directions due to two accidents of 36 vehicles in total caused by snowing near Vetrny Jenikov. (Lubos Pavlicek/CTK via AP)

Heavy snow in the Czech Republic has caused dozens of car crashes and closed down the country's major highway.

The Czech Hydro-meteorological Institute warned the snowfall was expected to hit six of the country's 14 regions, mostly in eastern Czech Republic.

The D1 highway, a key route that links the capital Prague with the country's east, was blocked at several places after multiple crashes, including trucks.

At least two people have been injured.

Regional traffic control officials say some 100 car crashes were reported Tuesday in one southeastern region, where the country's second-largest city, Brno, is located.

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Entertainment

Princess Charlotte is the boss of her brother, Queen Elizabeth reveals

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Princess Charlotte bosses her big brother Prince George, Queen Elizabeth reveals

PlaySamir Hussein/Getty Images

WATCH Princess Charlotte smiles on 1st day of preschool

Queen Elizabeth gave a peek into the royal family, revealing that Princess Charlotte, 2, is the boss of her older brother, 4-year-old Prince George.

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Queen Elizabeth, 91, made the remarks Sunday as she was presenting a bible to a 10-year-old girl, Emily Clay, and her mother at Sandringham, the queen's estate in Norfolk.

Princess Charlotte dons a pink backpack for 1st day of preschool Pregnant Princess Kate visits with schoolchildren a day after celebrating 36th birthday

Queen Elizabeth asked Emily if she “looked after” her younger sister.

PHOTO: Members of the Royal Family stand on the balcony of Buckingham Palace to watch a fly-past of aircraft by the Royal Air Force, in London on June 17, 2017.Chris J Ratcliffe/AFP/Getty Images
Members of the Royal Family stand on the balcony of Buckingham Palace to watch a fly-past of aircraft by the Royal Air Force, in London on June 17, 2017.

When Emily's mom said, “It’s the other way around," Queen Elizabeth replied, "It's like that with Charlotte and George."

Britains Prince William and Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge pose with their children Prince George and Princess Charlotte, at Kensington Palace in this undated photo provided by Kensington Palace. The photo has been used on the Cambridges Christmas card.Chris Jackson/Kensington Palace via Getty Images
Britain's Prince William and Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge pose with their children Prince George and Princess Charlotte, at Kensington Palace in this undated photo provided by Kensington Palace. The photo has been used on the Cambridges' Christmas card.

The remarks from Queen Elizabeth, Charlotte's and George's great-grandmother, are consistent with what Princess Kate has said about her two children's relationship. Last year, Kate said that Charlotte is "the one in charge."

PHOTO: Prince George and Princess Charlotte are seen at Buckingham Palace, attending the annual Trooping the Color Ceremony in London, June 17, 2017.James Whatling
Prince George and Princess Charlotte are seen at Buckingham Palace, attending the annual Trooping the Color Ceremony in London, June 17, 2017.

Charlotte already enjoys ponies and is understood to have started riding lessons along with George, just like their father, Prince William, and uncle, Prince Harry, did when they were young.

PHOTO: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (R) with her daughter Princess Charlotte (L) at the airport in Warsaw, Poland, July 17, 2017. Bartlomiej Zborowski/EPA
Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (R) with her daughter Princess Charlotte (L) at the airport in Warsaw, Poland, July 17, 2017.

On her family's tour of Germany and Poland last year, Charlotte proved she had already mastered her future role as fourth in line to the throne. She was seen curtsying and shaking the hand of her Polish and German hosts.

Charlotte, 2, was by the side of her mom, Princess Kate, when she ducked into a curtsy as the royal family departed Poland.Play
Princess Charlotte steals the show with a curtsy

Charlotte, who will turn 3 in May, also recently started preschool at Willcocks Nursery School, near Kensington Palace in London.

PHOTO: Princess Charlotte poses for a photo taken by her mother, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, at Kensington Palace shortly before she left for her first day of nursery at the Willcocks Nursery School, Jan. 8, 2018 in London.Kensington Palace
Princess Charlotte poses for a photo taken by her mother, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, at Kensington Palace shortly before she left for her first day of nursery at the Willcocks Nursery School, Jan. 8, 2018 in London.

Charlotte showed her confidence, beaming with pride and donning a pink backpack and red coat, in photographs taken by Kate on her first day of school.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are very pleased to share two photographs of Princess Charlotte at Kensington Palace this morning. pic.twitter.com/dDIOZdA7aM

— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) January 8, 2018

George started school at St. Thomas's Battersea School in September. Prior to that, George attended Westacre, a local Montessori school near the family's country home, Anmer Hall, in Norfolk.

Prince George arrives for his first day of school at Thomas's Battersea with his father The Duke of Cambridge. pic.twitter.com/B7TgcRA3Ve

— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) September 7, 2017

The two siblings will soon have a new addition to their relationship. William and Kate are expecting their third child in April.

PHOTO: Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Prince George of Cambridge and Princess Charlotte of Cambridge view helicopter models H145 and H135, July 21, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany.Samir Hussein/Getty Images
Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Prince George of Cambridge and Princess Charlotte of Cambridge view helicopter models H145 and H135, July 21, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany.
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World

Bahrain radar shows Qatar jets near UAE planes; Doha denies

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Bahrain radar shows Qatar jets near UAE planes; Doha denies

The Associated Press
Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, meets with Qatar's Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, left, at the Presidential Palace in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, Jan. 15, 2018. Al Thani's visit comes as the United Arab Emirates on Monday claimed that Qatari fighter jets intercepted two of its commercial airliners in international airspace on the way to Bahrain, allegations promptly denied by a Doha official. (Kayhan Ozer/Pool Photo via AP)

Bahrain released radar tracks on Tuesday it said showed Qatari fighter jets passing by Emirati commercial airliners bound for the island nation, encounters which set off a new dispute pitting Qatar against the Gulf nations that have been boycotting it since last summer.

The two alleged fly-bys on Monday morning could further escalate tensions between Qatar and the four Arab nations, among them the UAE, home to the world's busiest international airport. They also could affect long-haul airline travel, as the region's carriers are a crucial link between the East and West.

Emirati officials on Monday described the fly-bys as though the fighter jets "intercepted" their civilian aircraft. Qatari officials deny their jets intercepted the aircraft and on Tuesday dismissed the footage as "unauthenticated videos."

Bahrain state television aired radar footage it described as showing Emirates flight No. EK837 from Dubai flying toward Bahrain International Airport at 3,170 meters (10,400 feet). Two other radar signals described as Qatari fighter jets flew at around 2,590 meters (8,500 feet) and crossed briefly in front of the Emirates plane's flight path. The screen briefly flashes orange text, likely a collision warning.

It wasn't clear from the footage at what distance the fighter jets allegedly passed the Emirates flight, but Bahrain previously described the distance as being 3.2 kilometers (2 miles).

The broadcaster also aired footage of an aeronautical chart it said showed a Qatari fighter jet flying across the flight path of a just-passed Etihad airliner, both at 24,000 meters (8,000 feet). It identified the flight as ETD23B, which corresponds to Etihad flight No. EY371, a direct Abu Dhabi-Bahrain flight that took off Monday morning.

Dubai-based Emirates and Abu Dhabi-based Etihad have declined to comment. Both flights flew in international waters just north of the tip of Qatar, a peninsular nation that juts into the Persian Gulf, before landing in nearby Bahrain.

The UAE said it planned to file a complaint to the United Nations over what happened Monday.

Reached on Tuesday, Qatar's Government Communication Office dismissed the Bahrain state television report as part of a "smear campaign" against it by the UAE. The UAE's allegations follow two complaints by Qatar to the United Nations about Emirati military aircraft allegedly violating its airspace amid the diplomatic crisis. The UAE denies those allegations.

"These matter should be dealt with by filing a formal complaint to the U.N. Security Council, as Qatar has done following two breaches by UAE military aircraft of the state of Qatar's airspace, and not by distributing unauthenticated videos to the media as how the blockading nations have done since the start of the crisis," it said in a statement to The Associated Press.

At issue as well is language in the dispute. Intercepts normally refer to military jets flying alongside passenger planes and giving orders in emergencies. Military jets also don't necessarily file flight plans, as required by commercial airlines.

However, military mistakes have caused tragedy in the Persian Gulf before. In July 1988, the USS Vincennes in the Strait of Hormuz mistook an Iran Air flight heading to Dubai for an attacking fighter jet, shooting down the plane and killing all 290 people onboard.

Qatar's stock exchange dropped some 2.5 percent in trading Monday, one of its biggest jolts since the crisis began. On Tuesday, the market reversed the losses, closing up 2.58 percent.

Bahrain, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the UAE cut off Qatar's land, sea and air routes on June 5 over its alleged support of extremists and close ties with Iran.

Qatar has long denied funding extremists, though it supports Islamist opposition movements that are considered terrorist groups by other countries in the region. It recently restored full diplomatic ties with Iran, with which it shares a massive offshore natural gas field.

On Tuesday, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani offered support for Qatar during a meeting with Ahmed al-Mahmoud, the speaker of Qatar's emir-appointed advisory council.

"We believe any pressure on the government and nation of Qatar is unacceptable," Rouhani said in a statement on the presidency's website. "Iran is ready for any cooperation with the government and nation of Qatar and it will not allow Muslim people of the country to be under unfair pressure."

Al-Mahmoud thanked Tehran for its support, saying it helped Doha stand "firm before hostility and plots."

The diplomatic crisis has hurt Qatar Airways, Doha's long-haul carrier that competes with Emirates and Etihad.

Qatar had complained to the Montreal-based International Civil Aviation Organization about the boycotting nations cutting off its air routes, forcing the carrier to take longer flights through Iran and Turkey. Its regional feeder flights in Saudi Arabia and the UAE also have been cut off.

However, widening the Gulf dispute to include civilian aviation and airspace could hurt Emirati airlines already stung by President Donald Trump's travel bans, as well as last year's ban on laptops in airplane cabins, which has been lifted.

"I do think the tit-for-tat claims and the spillage into aviation risks tarnishing the reputation of the Gulf as a safe and secure location for the three global airlines that have made it their hub and a transit point for travelers," said Kristian Coates Ulrichsen, a research fellow at the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University.

"With the Gulf airlines coming under pressure from even longer-range aircraft that are capable of bypassing their hubs altogether, it makes little sense to risk the reputation for comfort and security that the Gulf airlines have so assiduously built up," he added.

———

Associated Press writer Nasser Karimi in Tehran, Iran, contributed to this report.

———

Follow Jon Gambrell on Twitter at www.twitter.com/jongambrellap . His work can be found at http://apne.ws/2galNpz .

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World

The Latest: Kosovo government security council convened

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The Latest: Kosovo government security council convened

The Associated Press
FILE – In this Feb. 22, 2017 file photo, Kosovo Serb politician Oliver Ivanovic, center, leaves the prison in the northern, Serb-dominated part of Mitrovica, Kosovo. Reports say unknown assailants have shot Ivanovic, Tuesday Jan. 16, 2018, and Serbia's state television says that doctors are struggling to save Ivanovic's life. (AP Photo/Bojan Slavkovic, File)

The Latest on the shooting of a Serb politician in Kosovo (all times local):

3:30 p.m.

Kosovo Prime Minister Ramush Haradinaj has called for a meeting of the country's National Security Council later Tuesday following the killing of Oliver Ivanovic, leader of an ethnic Serb political party, as he entered his party offices in the northern city of Mitrovica.

The government statement said the council "will discuss the general security situation in the country."

Kosovo police have offered a 10,000-euro ($12,250) reward for information on the attackers.

———

3:20 p.m.

People from Kosovo's Serb minority say they are in shock over the killing of a moderate politician who was gunned down in an attack in a northern town.

Zivorad Lazic, from the central town of Gracanica, says the attack on Oliver Ivanovic earlier on Tuesday comes "as we hope to live as normal people."

Lazic adds the killing will "affect the Kosovo people."

Slobodan Petrovic, another Kosovo Serb lawmaker, says Ivanovic's death will be a huge loss for the Serb community in Kosovo, where tensions have simmered since the 1998-99 war.

Petrovic warns that "we may have a lot of consequences" if authorities fail to find the killers.

Ethnic Albanian-dominated Kosovo declared independence from Serbia in 2008, but Belgrade does not recognize the split.

———

3.10 p.m.

Serbia's foreign minister says the killing in Kosovo of a leading Serb politician is threatening the stability of both Kosovo and the Balkan region.

Ivica Dacic told reporters during a visit to Montenegro Tuesday that the attack earlier in the day on Oliver Ivanovic presented a "senseless terrorist act."

Dacic adds "the most important thing is to preserve stability in the north of Kosovo," a Serb-dominated part of predominantly ethnic Albanian nation.

He insists that "when the stability of northern Kosovo is jeopardized, the stability of the entire Kosovo and the whole region is under threat." Dacic adds "this is a big blow and shot into the interests of the Serbian people in Kosovo."

Ivanovic was considered a moderate politician in the former Serbian province deeply divided along ethnic lines.

———

2:30 p.m.

The United Nations' senior official in Kosovo has strongly condemned the slaying of a Serb political leader in Kosovo.

The Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the U.N. Mission in Kosovo, Zahir Tanin, said Tuesday he was shocked and strongly condemned the killing of Oliver Ivanovic.

He urged investigative authorities to "work swiftly and effectively" and assured them that "all the international agencies on the ground are ready to support the authorities in any manner which may assist the swift apprehension of those responsible."

The U.N. mission governed Kosovo following Serbia's bloody crackdown against Kosovo Albanian separatists in 1999 and the NATO bombing that stopped it. After 2008, when Kosovo declared independence, it is playing a more minor role.

———

2:10 p.m.

Serbia's president says the country is demanding that international missions in Kosovo include his country in their investigation into the killing of a leading Serb politician in the tense region.

President Aleksandar Vucic said Tuesday that Serbia views the fatal attack on Oliver Ivanovic in Kosovo earlier in the day as a "terrorist act." He says "Serbia will take all necessary measures so the killer or killers are found."

Vucic says "there are interesting details that point who might be the killers." He did not elaborate.

Serbia lost authority over Kosovo after the 1998-99 war and the former Serbian province declared independence in 2008. Serbia has refused to recognize the split.

Vucic says the Serbian delegation has left EU-mediated talks in Brussels on normalizing ties with Kosovo because "it makes no sense to talk in such circumstances."

———

1:10 p.m.

The European Union's foreign policy chief has called the presidents of Serbia and Kosovo to express the EU's condemnation of the killing of Serb politician Oliver Ivanovic and make an appeal for calm.

The morning shooting came as both sides were about to start EU-mediated technical talks in Brussels on improving relations. It was unclear if there was any link between the two.

The EU said in a statement that Federica Mogherini said in her phone calls that the authorities in Kosovo should "spare no effort to find the perpetrators and bring them to justice without delay."

She also called on both sides "to show calm and restraint."

Mogherini last hosted the two presidents for talks last in September, the third such encounter last year. Talks between the two sides at a working group level should have resumed on Tuesday for the first time since the end of 2016.

———

1:05 p.m.

The international community has strongly denounced the slaying of a Serb leader in Kosovo.

The head of the OSCE Mission in Kosovo, Ambassador Jan Braathu, on Tuesday said he was "shocked and deeply saddened" and considered Oliver Ivanovic as "among the most prominent Kosovo Serb representatives for almost two decades … (with) relentless engagement for the benefit of his community and has been a valued interlocutor in Kosovo."

"This will be a major test for rule of law in Kosovo," Braathu said.

The U.S. Ambassador to Pristina Greg Delawie called on judicial bodies "to investigate this incident swiftly and professionally, and bring the perpetrators to justice."

He also urged "all sides to avoid dangerous rhetoric and remain calm at this sensitive time, and recommit themselves to continue the work toward the normalization of relations and improvement of the lives of the citizens of Kosovo and Serbia."

Last weekend the State Department warned its citizens to "exercise increased caution in Kosovo due to terrorism."

———

12 noon

Kosovo prime Minister Ramush Haradinaj says he considers the slaying of Serb minority political leader Oliver Ivanovic as "a punishable criminal act."

Reacting on his Facebook page to Ivanovic's death earlier Tuesday, Haradinaj said that "exploiting this tragic act for daily political goals, even to block processes aiming at normalizing ties between two countries, is against the logic and spirit of cooperation."

The talks between Serbia and Kosovo at the European Union have been suspended after the killing.

"Kosovo remains committed to create a safe environment for all its citizens and is powerfully set in its Euro-Atlantic path," Haradinaj said.

He also insisted that Kosovo authorities will do their utmost to clarify the killing adding that they will "in no situation accept the logic of calculating criminal acts for political purposes by anyone."

———

11:30 a.m.

Kosovo President Hashim Thaci has strongly denounced the killing of a Serb political leader in the northern city of Mitrovica.

Oliver Ivanovic, leader of the Citizens' Initiative Freedom, Democracy, Justice party was shot dead Tuesday morning by still-unknown assailants.

In a reaction on his Facebook page Thaci called on law enforcement authorities "to throw light as soon as possible on the circumstances of the death so that the perpetrators are brought to justice."

He also urged citizens in the north to cooperate with police.

———

11:25 a.m.

The talks between Serbia and Kosovo at the European Union have been suspended after the killing of Serb politician Oliver Ivanovic.

The 28-nation EU said it "strongly condemns the murder" and it expects authorities "to spare no effort to find the perpetrators and bring them to justice."

EU spokeswoman Maja Kocijancic said the EU calls on all sides "to show calm and restraint."

Talks between the two should have resumed on a technical level on Tuesday after they stopped in March last year when Kosovo Prime Minister Ramush Haradinaj, then leader of the opposition Kosovo Future Alliance party, was detained in France pending a court decision whether he would be extradited to Serbia. He was released the following month.

———

11:20 a.m.

Kosovo police have officially confirmed the shooting death of Serb political leader Oliver Ivanovic.

A statement Tuesday described how Ivanovic was shot at 8:10 a.m. near his office in Sutjeska Street in the northern city of Mitrovica.

Ivanovic was taken to the hospital where doctors confirmed his death.

The statement adds that about an hour later an Opel Astra car was found burned out in another Mitrovica street, and police believe that it was used by the perpetrators.

The investigation is continuing.

———

11:15 a.m.

Serbian state television says that the country's delegation has walked out of an EU-mediated dialogue with Kosovo leaders after the killing of a leading Serb politician in Kosovo.

The report said Tuesday that the Serbian team is on its way back to Belgrade from Brussels after unknown assailants shot and killed Oliver Ivanovic in Serb-held Mitrovica early Tuesday.

The killing is likely to heighten tensions in Kosovo amid attempts to normalize ties between the former foes. Kosovo declared independence from Serbia in 2008, but Belgrade has refused to recognize the split.

Some 10,000 people died during the 1998-99 war in Kosovo which ended after NATO bombed Serbia for 78 days in 1999.

———

11:05 a.m.

Doctors say that Serb politician Oliver Ivanovic received at least five gunshot wounds to his upper torso when shot by unknown assailants.

Milan Ivanovic, the head of Mitrovica hospital and who is not related to the politician, said Tuesday that doctors attempted to save Ivanovic but could do nothing.

Unknown assailants opened fire on Ivanovic outside the offices of his political party in an action that is likely to stir tensions in Kosovo almost exactly 10 years after it declared independence from Serbia.

The region has remained tense despite efforts by EU officials to mediate talks between Serbia and Kosovo leaders on normalizing ties. Serbia does not recognize Kosovo's independence.

———

11 a.m.

A Serbian official says that the killing in Kosovo of a leading Serb politician is a "criminal act of terror" aimed at pushing the volatile region into chaos.

Marko Djuric, the Serbian government's official dealing with Kosovo, said Tuesday that "whoever is behind this attack … whether they are Serb, Albanian or any other criminals, they must be punished."

Djuric adds that the attack earlier Tuesday on Oliver Ivanovic in Mitrovica "is an attempt to push the Serbian people into chaos, to push Serbia into chaos."

Kosovo remains tense, a decade after declaring independence from Serbia in 2008. Serbia does not recognize the split and EU-mediated talks have been underway in a bid to normalize ties.

About 10,000 people died in the 1998-99 war between Serb forces and Kosovo ethnic Albanian rebels.

———

10:55 a.m.

The Kosovo government has strongly denounced the slaying of a leading Serb politician in northern Mitrovica and says it consicers it to be a challenge to "the rule of law and efforts to establish the rule of law in the whole of Kosovo territory."

The government issued a statement Tuesday following the death of Oliver Ivanovic, who was shot in the morning outside the offices of his Citizens' Initiative party in the northern city of Mitrovica.

"Violence is unacceptable, without taking into consideration where it comes from and toward whom it is directed," said the statement.

The government also invited all citizens to cooperate and urged law-enforcement institutions to seize the perpetrators and bring them to justice.

———

10:40 a.m.

Serbian state television says that President Aleksandar Vucic has called a top security meeting after the shooting death in Kosovo of a leading Serb politician.

Vucic also will address the public at 1200 GMT on Tuesday about the death of Oliver Ivanovic, who was shot Tuesday morning in Serb-held northern Mitrovica.

Media reports say that unknown assailants opened fire at Ivanovic outside the offices of his Citizens' Initiative party in Mitrovica. Ivanovic's lawyer, Nebojsa Vlajic, confirmed Ivanovic died of wounds sustained in the attack.

The attack is likely to heighten ethnic tensions in Kosovo, a former Serbian province that declared independence in 2008.

———

10:20 a.m.

The lawyer for leading Serb politician in northern Kosovo Oliver Ivanovic says he has been shot dead.

"Unfortunately, I wish it weren't true, but doctors declared Oliver dead at 9:30 this morning," Nebojsa Vlajic, Ivanovic's lawyer confimed to The Associated Press by phone.

Serbian media reported that unknown assailants opened fire on Ivanovic in front of the offices of his Citizens' Initiative Party.

The 64-year-old was one of the key politicians in Serb-dominated northern Kosovo, a former Serbian province where tensions remain high a decade after it declared independence.

A Kosovo court convicted Ivanovic of war crimes during the 1998-99 war. That verdict was overturned and a retrial had been underway.

———

9:55 a.m.

Serbian media are reporting that a leading Serb politician in northern Kosovo, Oliver Ivanovic, has been shot.

There was no immediate confirmation by the police in Kosovo of the reported incident on Tuesday morning. Reports say unknown assailants opened fire on Ivanovic in front of the offices of his Citizens' Initiative Party.

Serbia's state television says that doctors are struggling to save Ivanovic's life, while Vecernje Novosti daily reported that Ivanovic has died.

The 64-year-old is one of the key politicians in Serb-dominated northern Kosovo, a former Serbian province where tensions remain high a decade after it declared independence.

A Kosovo court convicted Ivanovic of war crimes during the 1998-99 war. That verdict was overturned and a retrial is underway.

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World

Danish man charged with killing reporter on his submarine

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Danish man charged with killing reporter on his submarine

The Associated Press
FILE – This is a Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017, file photo of police technicians board Peter Madsen's submarine UC3 Nautilus on a pier in Copenhagen harbour, Denmark. A Danish prosecutor said Tuesday Jan. 16, 2018 that inventor Peter Madsen has been charged with murdering Swedish journalist Kim Wall during a trip on his private submarine, saying he either cut her throat or strangled her. Prosecutor Jakob Buch-Jepsen said Tuesday the case is "very unusual and extremely gross."(Jacob Ehrbahn/Ritzau Foto, File via AP)

Inventor Peter Madsen was charged Tuesday with killing Swedish journalist Kim Wall during a trip on his private submarine, with prosecutors saying he either cut her throat or strangled her before dismembering her body and dumping it into the sea.

Prosecutor Jakob Buch-Jepsen called the case "very unusual and extremely disturbing."

Madsen, 47, is charged with murder, dismemberment and indecent handling of a corpse for the way he disposed of Wall's body. He is also charged with having sexual relations with Wall, 30, of a "particularly dangerous nature" before she was killed.

The charges were made public by the Danish prosecution authority.

Buch-Jepsen said the killing was premeditated. Prosecutors will urge that Madsen be sentenced to life in prison, or be locked up in a secure mental facility if deemed necessary by psychiatrists for as long as he's considered sick and dangerous to others.

"There is much technical evidence but I won't go into details right now," Buch-Jepsen told a brief news conference. He also declined to comment on Madsen's motive.

"Evidence must be presented in court and not in the media," he said, adding he also didn't want to comment out of respect for Wall's family.

Madsen's defense lawyer Betina Hald Engmark had no immediate comment in reaction to the charges, adding her client still denies murdering Wall.

Madsen and Wall had gone on a trip in Madsen's submarine on Aug. 10. Wall, who was working on a story about Madsen, was last seen aboard the vessel as it left Copenhagen. The next day, Madsen — an entrepreneur who once dreamed of launching a manned space mission — was rescued from the sinking submarine without Wall.

Police believe he deliberately sank the vessel.

Madsen has offered a shifting variety of explanations for Wall's death. Initially, he told authorities he had dropped Wall off on an island several hours after their voyage began. Then he claimed that Wall died accidentally inside the submarine while he was on deck during the excursion and he had "buried" her at sea. However, he later admitted throwing her body parts into the sea.

Wall's dismembered, naked torso was found on a southern Copenhagen shoreline in late August. Her head, legs and clothes were discovered in bags at sea in October, along with heavy metal objects designed to take them to the ocean floor.

Multiple knife wounds had been found on her torso and Buch-Jepsen said Tuesday Madsen had stabbed Wall several times while she was alive but declined to elaborate.

Authorities also want to destroy Madsen's submarine.

Madsen's trial starts March 8 and a verdict is expected on April 25.

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Entertainment

Rick Springfield opens up about his battle with depression to give others ‘hope’

Rick-springfield-gty-hb-180115_31x13_992

Rick Springfield says he wants people contemplating suicide to 'know that the moment will pass'

PlayJerod Harris/Getty Images

WATCH Rick Springfield opens up about his battle with depression

Rock music icon Rick Springfield is speaking out about his decades-long battle with depression — which he says led him to contemplate suicide on multiple occasions — in hopes that his story will give others suffering from the disease "hope."

"I want them to have hope … and know that the moment will pass," Springfield, 68, said in an exclusive interview with ABC News' Paula Faris. "I'm an example of the moment passing, because I've been there a couple of times, and haven't … for want of a better phrase, pulled the trigger."

Rick Springfield reveals he considered suicide last year Rick Springfield explains why his music lasts

The Australian musician, who skyrocketed to fame in the 1980's with his hits like "Jesse's Girl" and "I've Done Everything for You," has opened up about his battle with depression before, writing about a failed suicide attempt at age 16 in his autobiography, "Late, Late at Night."

"I put the noose around the thing, and stood on a chair, and kicked it away, and hung there for a while, until I started to lose consciousness," Springfield told Faris of his adolescent suicide attempt.

PHOTO: Rick Springfield is seen here May 27, 2016.Tyler Golden/ABC via Getty Images, FILE
Rick Springfield is seen here May 27, 2016.

"The rope … broke, or came undone, or something," he added. "I still don't know what happened."

Decades later, Springfield said his depression still hadn't left him, and even led him to contemplate suicide again, just last year.

"I was close enough," Springfield said. "I worked my way through it. Which I've always done."

Springfield described his depression, which he calls "Mr. D," as something that "you kind of become acclimatized to … almost like a friend."

He added that suicidal thoughts are "part of my makeup."

'When you get to the really dark point nothing's enough'

The father of two said he has always "been very open" with his two children about his depression, saying: "They see the darkness in me."

He added that while he knows taking his own life would "devastate" his family, in his darkest moments, he isn't able to think about that.

"You think, 'They'll, you know, they'll get through it.' And they will, because we're human beings and we deal with stuff," he said, adding that during his worst bouts of depression, all he is able to think about is "just getting out."

"When you get to that point the pain is pretty intolerable," Springfield said.

However, Springfield said his family and the "feeling that there's some way that I can help this planet" is what makes him feel life is worth living.

PHOTO: Rick Springfield performs at the Ryman Auditorium, May 20, 2015, in Atlanta.Katie Darby/Invision/AP, FILE
Rick Springfield performs at the Ryman Auditorium, May 20, 2015, in Atlanta.

Despite his love for his family and his passion for helping the environment, Springfield said the fear that this is "not enough" still creeps in at times when you have depression.

"When you get to the really dark point, nothing's enough," he explained.

'Fame and success and money do not heal' depression: Springfield

The rocker also slammed the misconception that depression doesn't affect those who achieve fame or success.

"Accomplishment is nothing, it doesn't change who you are," he said. "That's a big belief. You know … 'If I have this house, I have this wife, if I have this car.'

PHOTO: Jacklyn Zeman and Rick Springfield on General Hospital, July 9, 1981.ABC Photo Archives via Getty Images, FILE
Jacklyn Zeman and Rick Springfield on "General Hospital," July 9, 1981.

"That's a big misconception," he added. "Fame and success and money do not heal."

While Springfield treats his depression with medication, he also says he is able to channel some of it into his writing and music.

"I try and write about it, definitely. It's a big motivator for me to sit down, and pick up a guitar, or start writing prose or whatever," he said.

"I don't know what where I'd be if I didn't have that out," he added.

Springfield's words are shedding light on a disease the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes as "a serious medical illness" and "important public health issue."

The disease "is characterized by persistent sadness and sometimes irritability (particularly in children) and is one of the leading causes of disease or injury worldwide for both men and women," the CDC said in a statement on their website.

If you or someone you know are having suicidal thoughts or other mental health concerns, trained crisis workers are available 24 hours a day through the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Help is offered in English or Spanish. Call 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255)

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Entertainment

Trump mocked for golfing in lieu of volunteering on Martin Luther King Jr. Day

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Trump mocked for golfing in lieu of volunteering on Martin Luther King Jr. Day

PlayThe Associated Press

WATCH Trump mocked for golfing in lieu of volunteering on Martin Luther King Jr. Day

President Donald Trump found himself in the hot seat on Monday after he decided to go golfing on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, breaking with a years-long tradition set by previous presidents who commemorated the holiday by performing civic duties.

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The late-night shows found the topic rich for attack on Monday night.

"In the past, Presidents Obama and Bush did volunteer work on this day to honor Dr. King. President Trump today played golf to honor him," Jimmy Kimmel said Monday on "Live." "He made his 95th visit since becoming president to one of the golf courses he owns: the Trump International Golf Club in Palm Beach. Just as Dr. King would have wanted, which is especially glaring considering the fact people have been calling Trump a racist all weekend."

PHOTO: President Barack Obama participates in a community service project at Leckie Elementary school in celebration of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service and in honor of Dr. Kings life and legacy, Jan. 18, 2016 in Washington, DC. Olivier Douliery/Getty Images, File
President Barack Obama participates in a community service project at Leckie Elementary school in celebration of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service and in honor of Dr. King's life and legacy, Jan. 18, 2016 in Washington, DC.

The criticism came just one day after Trump declared that he is "not a racist" as he denied reports that he referred to Haiti and African countries as "s—hole countries."

"No, no, I'm not a racist," Trump told reporters on Sunday. "I am the least racist person you have ever interviewed. That I can tell you."

The comments were reportedly made during a closed-door meeting with members of Congress to discuss immigration on Thursday.

From tonight’s #LNSM: How Trump spent #MLKJrDay. pic.twitter.com/NJzACGP5IJ

— Late Night with Seth Meyers (@LateNightSeth) January 16, 2018

According to the reports, Trump also said the United States should accept more immigrants from countries like Norway.

Trevor Noah, host of "The Daily Show," tried to find humor in the situation — now referred to as 's—hole-gate.'"

"'I am the least racist person you have ever interviewed' seems like a ridiculous statement from Donald Trump, until you realize he was speaking to the chief reporter from the Klu Klux Kronicle," Noah said Monday evening.

PHOTO: President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama help paint a mural depicting Martin Luther King Jr., at the Jobs Have Priority Naylor Road Family Shelter, Jan. 16, 2017 in Washington.Michael Reynolds/Getty Images
President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama help paint a mural depicting Martin Luther King Jr., at the Jobs Have Priority Naylor Road Family Shelter, Jan. 16, 2017 in Washington.

He pointed out that two U.S. lawmakers claimed they personally heard Trump make the vulgar remark, but he said the president’s alleged vulgarity was not his main concern.

"Him having a poo-poo mouth is not the story for me," Noah said. "The president of the United States condemning entire groups of people as worthless and undesirable based on what country they happen to be born in, that's the story."

Trump: “I am not a racist. I am the least racist person you have ever interviewed.”

Really? The only way that’s true is if that reporter works for KKKat Fancy. The magazine for lovers of racist felines. #LSSC pic.twitter.com/rbsk69B8XY

— The Late Show (@colbertlateshow) January 16, 2018

Over on "The Late Show," host Stephen Colbert asked his guest, Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., if he thought Trump made the controversial comments.

"I have no doubts," Schumer replied. "Donald Trump has lied so many times it's hard to believe him on anything let alone this.

PHOTO: President George W. Bush helps volunteers paint a mural at a high school during the Martin Luther King Jr day of service in Washington, Jan. 15, 2007. Brooks Kraft/Corbis via Getty Images
President George W. Bush helps volunteers paint a mural at a high school during the Martin Luther King Jr day of service in Washington, Jan. 15, 2007.

"His comments over and over and over again can be described as nothing but racist and obnoxious," he added.

TONIGHT: After Trump's sh*thole comments and a tweet attacking "Senator Dicky Durbin," #LSSC asks #WhatTheChuck?! @SenSchumer addresses the controversy and defends his fellow Democrat. pic.twitter.com/7SbDo9TTQS

— The Late Show (@colbertlateshow) January 16, 2018

Schumer also presented the president with a challenge that he said would prove that he wasn't racist.

PHOTO: President Bill Clinton, Vice President Al Gore tear down a wall to begin renovation of the Regency House, a senior health center, Jan. 18, 1999 in Washington. Stephen Jaffe/AFP/Getty Images
President Bill Clinton, Vice President Al Gore tear down a wall to begin renovation of the Regency House, a senior health center, Jan. 18, 1999 in Washington.

"Actions speak louder than words," Schumer said. "If you want to just begin the long road back to proving you're not racist or bigoted, support the bipartisan compromise three Democrats and three Republicans put on the floor, everyone gave, and get the Dreamers safety here in America.

"That's what he should do," he added.

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World

The Latest: EU foreign chief calls Kosovo, Serb leaders

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The Latest: EU foreign chief calls Kosovo, Serb leaders

The Associated Press
FILE – In this Feb. 22, 2017 file photo, Kosovo Serb politician Oliver Ivanovic, center, leaves the prison in the northern, Serb-dominated part of Mitrovica, Kosovo. Reports say unknown assailants have shot Ivanovic, Tuesday Jan. 16, 2018, and Serbia's state television says that doctors are struggling to save Ivanovic's life. (AP Photo/Bojan Slavkovic, File)

The Latest on the shooting of a Serb politician in Kosovo (all times local):

1:10 p.m.

The European Union's foreign policy chief has called the presidents of Serbia and Kosovo to express the EU's condemnation of the killing of Serb politician Oliver Ivanovic and make an appeal for calm.

The morning shooting came as both sides were about to start EU-mediated technical talks in Brussels on improving relations. It was unclear if there was any link between the two.

The EU said in a statement that Federica Mogherini said in her phone calls that the authorities in Kosovo should "spare no effort to find the perpetrators and bring them to justice without delay."

She also called on both sides "to show calm and restraint."

Mogherini last hosted the two presidents for talks last in September, the third such encounter last year. Talks between the two sides at a working group level should have resumed on Tuesday for the first time since the end of 2016.

———

1:05 p.m.

The international community has strongly denounced the slaying of a Serb leader in Kosovo.

The head of the OSCE Mission in Kosovo, Ambassador Jan Braathu, on Tuesday said he was "shocked and deeply saddened" and considered Oliver Ivanovic as "among the most prominent Kosovo Serb representatives for almost two decades … (with) relentless engagement for the benefit of his community and has been a valued interlocutor in Kosovo."

"This will be a major test for rule of law in Kosovo," Braathu said.

The U.S. Ambassador to Pristina Greg Delawie called on judicial bodies "to investigate this incident swiftly and professionally, and bring the perpetrators to justice."

He also urged "all sides to avoid dangerous rhetoric and remain calm at this sensitive time, and recommit themselves to continue the work toward the normalization of relations and improvement of the lives of the citizens of Kosovo and Serbia."

Last weekend the State Department warned its citizens to "exercise increased caution in Kosovo due to terrorism."

———

12 noon

Kosovo prime Minister Ramush Haradinaj says he considers the slaying of Serb minority political leader Oliver Ivanovic as "a punishable criminal act."

Reacting on his Facebook page to Ivanovic's death earlier Tuesday, Haradinaj said that "exploiting this tragic act for daily political goals, even to block processes aiming at normalizing ties between two countries, is against the logic and spirit of cooperation."

The talks between Serbia and Kosovo at the European Union have been suspended after the killing.

"Kosovo remains committed to create a safe environment for all its citizens and is powerfully set in its Euro-Atlantic path," Haradinaj said.

He also insisted that Kosovo authorities will do their utmost to clarify the killing adding that they will "in no situation accept the logic of calculating criminal acts for political purposes by anyone."

———

11:30 a.m.

Kosovo President Hashim Thaci has strongly denounced the killing of a Serb political leader in the northern city of Mitrovica.

Oliver Ivanovic, leader of the Citizens' Initiative Freedom, Democracy, Justice party was shot dead Tuesday morning by still-unknown assailants.

In a reaction on his Facebook page Thaci called on law enforcement authorities "to throw light as soon as possible on the circumstances of the death so that the perpetrators are brought to justice."

He also urged citizens in the north to cooperate with police.

———

11:25 a.m.

The talks between Serbia and Kosovo at the European Union have been suspended after the killing of Serb politician Oliver Ivanovic.

The 28-nation EU said it "strongly condemns the murder" and it expects authorities "to spare no effort to find the perpetrators and bring them to justice."

EU spokeswoman Maja Kocijancic said the EU calls on all sides "to show calm and restraint."

Talks between the two should have resumed on a technical level on Tuesday after they stopped in March last year when Kosovo Prime Minister Ramush Haradinaj, then leader of the opposition Kosovo Future Alliance party, was detained in France pending a court decision whether he would be extradited to Serbia. He was released the following month.

———

11:20 a.m.

Kosovo police have officially confirmed the shooting death of Serb political leader Oliver Ivanovic.

A statement Tuesday described how Ivanovic was shot at 8:10 a.m. near his office in Sutjeska Street in the northern city of Mitrovica.

Ivanovic was taken to the hospital where doctors confirmed his death.

The statement adds that about an hour later an Opel Astra car was found burned out in another Mitrovica street, and police believe that it was used by the perpetrators.

The investigation is continuing.

———

11:15 a.m.

Serbian state television says that the country's delegation has walked out of an EU-mediated dialogue with Kosovo leaders after the killing of a leading Serb politician in Kosovo.

The report said Tuesday that the Serbian team is on its way back to Belgrade from Brussels after unknown assailants shot and killed Oliver Ivanovic in Serb-held Mitrovica early Tuesday.

The killing is likely to heighten tensions in Kosovo amid attempts to normalize ties between the former foes. Kosovo declared independence from Serbia in 2008, but Belgrade has refused to recognize the split.

Some 10,000 people died during the 1998-99 war in Kosovo which ended after NATO bombed Serbia for 78 days in 1999.

———

11:05 a.m.

Doctors say that Serb politician Oliver Ivanovic received at least five gunshot wounds to his upper torso when shot by unknown assailants.

Milan Ivanovic, the head of Mitrovica hospital and who is not related to the politician, said Tuesday that doctors attempted to save Ivanovic but could do nothing.

Unknown assailants opened fire on Ivanovic outside the offices of his political party in an action that is likely to stir tensions in Kosovo almost exactly 10 years after it declared independence from Serbia.

The region has remained tense despite efforts by EU officials to mediate talks between Serbia and Kosovo leaders on normalizing ties. Serbia does not recognize Kosovo's independence.

———

11 a.m.

A Serbian official says that the killing in Kosovo of a leading Serb politician is a "criminal act of terror" aimed at pushing the volatile region into chaos.

Marko Djuric, the Serbian government's official dealing with Kosovo, said Tuesday that "whoever is behind this attack … whether they are Serb, Albanian or any other criminals, they must be punished."

Djuric adds that the attack earlier Tuesday on Oliver Ivanovic in Mitrovica "is an attempt to push the Serbian people into chaos, to push Serbia into chaos."

Kosovo remains tense, a decade after declaring independence from Serbia in 2008. Serbia does not recognize the split and EU-mediated talks have been underway in a bid to normalize ties.

About 10,000 people died in the 1998-99 war between Serb forces and Kosovo ethnic Albanian rebels.

———

10:55 a.m.

The Kosovo government has strongly denounced the slaying of a leading Serb politician in northern Mitrovica and says it consicers it to be a challenge to "the rule of law and efforts to establish the rule of law in the whole of Kosovo territory."

The government issued a statement Tuesday following the death of Oliver Ivanovic, who was shot in the morning outside the offices of his Citizens' Initiative party in the northern city of Mitrovica.

"Violence is unacceptable, without taking into consideration where it comes from and toward whom it is directed," said the statement.

The government also invited all citizens to cooperate and urged law-enforcement institutions to seize the perpetrators and bring them to justice.

———

10:40 a.m.

Serbian state television says that President Aleksandar Vucic has called a top security meeting after the shooting death in Kosovo of a leading Serb politician.

Vucic also will address the public at 1200 GMT on Tuesday about the death of Oliver Ivanovic, who was shot Tuesday morning in Serb-held northern Mitrovica.

Media reports say that unknown assailants opened fire at Ivanovic outside the offices of his Citizens' Initiative party in Mitrovica. Ivanovic's lawyer, Nebojsa Vlajic, confirmed Ivanovic died of wounds sustained in the attack.

The attack is likely to heighten ethnic tensions in Kosovo, a former Serbian province that declared independence in 2008.

———

10:20 a.m.

The lawyer for leading Serb politician in northern Kosovo Oliver Ivanovic says he has been shot dead.

"Unfortunately, I wish it weren't true, but doctors declared Oliver dead at 9:30 this morning," Nebojsa Vlajic, Ivanovic's lawyer confimed to The Associated Press by phone.

Serbian media reported that unknown assailants opened fire on Ivanovic in front of the offices of his Citizens' Initiative Party.

The 64-year-old was one of the key politicians in Serb-dominated northern Kosovo, a former Serbian province where tensions remain high a decade after it declared independence.

A Kosovo court convicted Ivanovic of war crimes during the 1998-99 war. That verdict was overturned and a retrial had been underway.

———

9:55 a.m.

Serbian media are reporting that a leading Serb politician in northern Kosovo, Oliver Ivanovic, has been shot.

There was no immediate confirmation by the police in Kosovo of the reported incident on Tuesday morning. Reports say unknown assailants opened fire on Ivanovic in front of the offices of his Citizens' Initiative Party.

Serbia's state television says that doctors are struggling to save Ivanovic's life, while Vecernje Novosti daily reported that Ivanovic has died.

The 64-year-old is one of the key politicians in Serb-dominated northern Kosovo, a former Serbian province where tensions remain high a decade after it declared independence.

A Kosovo court convicted Ivanovic of war crimes during the 1998-99 war. That verdict was overturned and a retrial is underway.

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