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‘ER’ Heads to Hulu in Exclusive Streaming Pact

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'ER' Heads to Hulu in Exclusive Streaming Pact

'ER'

In this story

TCA | Television Critics Association
TCA | Television Critics Association
Hulu
Hulu

The streamer has also picked up the second installment of British drama series 'National Treasure' and a sequel to documentary 'March of the Penguins.'

The doctors of County General Hospital have found a new home.

Hulu has nabbed the exclusive streaming rights to ER, bringing the entire classic medical drama to streaming for the first time.

in the pact with Warner Bros. Domestic Television, Hulu has licensed all 15 seasons (or more than 330 episodes) of the series. They will begin streaming on Sunday.

ER premiered on NBC in 1994 and helped to accelerate the careers of George Clooney, Noah Wyle and Julianna Margulies. The series was created by Michael Crichton and executive produced by John Wells with Steven Spielberg's Amblin Television and Constant c Productions. It became the longest-running primetime medical drama on television and was nominated for 124 Emmy Awards, the most of any drama, and winning 23 Emmys.

Clooney, who is now in business with Hulu on a new Catch-22 series, said of the news, "It was such an honor to be a part of this show. I was lucky to have worked with so many writers, actors and directors all at the top of their game. Most importantly I've made friends for a lifetime. I'm excited it will finally be streaming on Hulu."

The news, revealed ahead of Hulu's semi-annual appearance before TV press, capped off a series of announcements for the streamer.

Hulu also said that it has picked up U.S. streaming rights to a second installment of the British drama National Treasure. The series, which will debut in full on April 4, comes after Hulu picked up streaming rights to the first season. The new season, National Treasure: Kiri, will follow a young black girl who is about to be adopted by her white foster family. It was created and written by Jack Thorne.

Further, the streamer has announced that it has acquired March of the Penguins 2: The Next Step, a sequel to the 2005 documentary. March of the Penguins won the Academy Award for documentary the year after it was released. The follow-up, from filmmaker Luc Jacquet and featuring narrator Morgan Freeman, premiered last year in France.

March of the Penguins 2 joins a small but growing slate of Hulu documentaries, including The Beatles: Eight Days a Week — The Touring Years, Becoming Bond and Batman and Bill.

Hulu has also announced that Emmy- and Golden Globe- winning The Handmaid's Tale will return for a second season on April 25, and comedy Casual will bow its final season on July 31.

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Read the full article – Hollywoodreporter.com

TV

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Season 2 Trailer Expands the World of Hulu’s Dystopian Drama

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'The Handmaid's Tale' Season 2 Trailer Expands the World of Hulu's Dystopian Drama

'The Handmaid's Tale'

The award-winning series will return for its second season on April 25 with two new episodes.

This April, June returns.

Hulu has released the first official trailer for The Handmaid's Tale season two, which is set to premiere April 25 on the streaming service with two new episodes, and with subsequent episodes to be released every Wednesday. Clocking in at only a minute, the teaser for the second season of the award-winning dystopian series also offers a first look at newcorners to the Handmaid's universe: Janine (Madeline Brewer), for instance, stands in a sunlit field that feels rather far away from the Boston setting in which the show takes place. A trip to the enigmatic "colonies," often discussed as a dire outcome but never seen firsthand in season one, looks like it is in the offing for season two.

What's more, the first look at season two of Handmaid's Tale offers longtime fans of the Margaret Atwood novel on which the show is based something fully new. The first season ended in the same fashion as Atwood's book, which leaves showrunner Bruce Miller's TV adaptation in a position to continue the story of June Osborne (Elisabeth Moss) and the dark nation of Gilead without new stories from the source material guiding the way forward.

By design, the new Hulu teaser doesn't give away much in terms of Miller's vision of the show's future. The trailer is set to artist Malia J's cover of Buffalo Springfield's "For What It's Worth," scoring several dialogue-free images: June in full Handmaid regalia, albeit with the horrifying addition of a muzzle; Commander Waterford (Joseph Fiennes) dressed to the nines at an event in one moment and approaching a gagged man in the woods with gun in hand at another turn; June and Luke (O. T. Fagbenle) sharing a happy moment with their daughter Hannah, which confirms the series will keep its flashback storytelling mechanism in place for season two; Luke together with June's best friend Moira (Samira Wiley), both of them safely in Canada by the end of the first season; and June tearfully meeting up with Nick (Max Minghella), the father of her unborn child.

Watch the trailer below.

Indeed, the most pressing question about the future of The Handmaid's Tale, at least from a narrative standpoint, is: How will season two handle and advance the story of June's pregnancy, which was revealed in the first-season finale? Shortly after the revelation, June and other Handmaids defied Aunt Lydia (Ann Dowd) by refusing to execute Janine, an act of disobedience that Lydia promised would have consequences. Those consequences apparently came swiftly, as June ended the season in the back of a black van, her fate and the fate of her unborn child unknown.

How will that cliffhanger resolve itself? For her part, Moss has described season two as "inspiring, gut-wrenching" and an example of "resistance." Beyond that tease, Atwood's text provides no clues as to the future of the series, so the book-reading and show-only viewers will all experience the next chapter together when Handmaid's Tale returns to Hulu in April.

The 13-episode second season will be shaped by June's pregnancy and her ongoing fight to free her future child from the dystopian horrors of Gilead. "Gilead is within you" is a favorite saying of Aunt Lydia. In season two, June and all characters will fight against — or succumb to — this dark truth.

The Handmaid's Tale comes to Hulu from MGM Television and is created, executive produced and written by Miller, and is also executive produced by Warren Littlefield, Moss, Daniel Wilson, Fran Sears and Ilene Chaiken. MGM serves as the international distributor for the series.

What do you make of The Handmaid's Tale season two trailer? Sound off in the comments section below with your take, and follow THR.com/HandmaidsTale for more coverage of the series.

The Handmaid's Tale
Read the full article – Hollywoodreporter.com

World

The Latest: Peruvian quake destroys 63 homes, kills 1 man

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The Latest: Peruvian quake destroys 63 homes, kills 1 man

The Associated Press
This photo released by Andina Agency shows residents in Chala, Peru, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, after an earthquake struck the area. The powerful earthquake struck off Peru's coast early Sunday, tumbling adobe homes in small, rural towns, officials said. (Andina Agency via AP)

The Latest on Peru earthquake (all times local):

2 p.m.

Officials in Peru say dozens of families are without homes after a powerful earthquake rattled the coast before dawn, killing one person.

Peru's Chief of Civil Defense Jorge Chavez said Sunday that the earthquake killed one person, destroyed 63 homes and displacing about 130 people. It injured 65 people.

The U.S. Geological Survey says the magnitude 7.1 quake was centered 35 miles (40 kilometers) from Acari, a small town in the Arequipa department of southwestern Peru. Residents in Peru's capital of Lima some 350 miles (560 kilometers) away felt the ground shake.

Chavez says emergency crews are sending tents and mattresses to the displaced families.

Officials say a man killed by falling debris was the quake's sole fatality.

———

10:30 a.m.

Officials in Peru say this morning's powerful earthquake so far has caused one reported death and 57 injuries.

The magnitude 7.1 quake also knocked down adobe homes in small, rural towns and forced closure of some roads.

The U.S. Geological Survey says the early morning quake had a magnitude was centered 25 miles (40 kilometers) from Acari, a small town in the Arequipa department of southwestern Peru. It was felt at least as far away as the Peruvian capital of Lima, some 350 miles (560 kilometers) from Acari.

President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski said on Twitter he's en route to the affected region to "verify the magnitude of the damage and send the needed humanitarian aid."

———

5:45 a.m.

A U.S. agency says there is no longer a tsunami threat from a powerful earthquake that struck off Peru.

Earlier, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center warned of "hazardous tsunami waves" for some coasts, saying there was a threat to some coasts of Peru and neighboring Chile.

But a later message said "there is no longer a tsunami threat from this earthquake" and that the center hadn't observed any tsunami waves.

An earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 7.3 hit off Peru's coast at 0918 GMT (4:18 a.m. EST). The epicenter was 42 kilometers (26 miles) south-southwest of Acari.

———

5:20 a.m.

A U.S. agency has issued a tsunami threat message for parts of Peru and Chile's coastlines after a powerful earthquake.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center says that "hazardous tsunami waves are forecast for some coasts."

The statement says that tsunami waves reaching 0.3 meters to one meter "above the tide level are possible for some coasts of Peru." It also says waves are forecast to be less than 0.3 meters for the coasts of Chile.

An earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 7.3 struck off Peru's coast at 0918 GMT (4:18 a.m. EST). The epicenter was 42 kilometers (26 miles) south-southwest of Acari.

———

5 a.m.

The U.S. Geological Survey is reporting an earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 7.3 off Peru's coast. There have been no immediate reports of casualties or damage.

The USGS says that the temblor struck 42 kilometers (26 miles) south-southwest of Acari at 0918 GMT (4:18 a.m. EST) on Sunday at a depth of 12.1 kilometers (about 7.5 miles).

It wasn't immediately clear if a tsunami warning has been issued.

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World

Qatar exile says he’s held by UAE; Abu Dhabi denies claim

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Qatar exile says he's held by UAE; Abu Dhabi denies claim

The Associated Press
FILE- In this Aug. 17, 2017 file photo, released by the state-run Saudi Press Agency, Saudi King Salman, left, walks with Qatari Sheikh Abdullah bin Ali Al Thani, right, at the monarch's vacation home in Tangiers, Morocco. Exiled Sheikh Abdullah, once promoted by Saudi Arabia amid its ongoing dispute with Doha, appeared in an online video posted Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, and aired by Doha-based satellite news network Al-Jazeera, claiming he's being held against his will in the United Arab Emirates, an allegation denied by an Abu Dhabi official. (Saudi Press Agency via AP)

An exiled Qatari ruling family member once promoted by Saudi Arabia amid its ongoing dispute with Doha appeared in an online video Sunday claiming he's being held against his will in the United Arab Emirates, an allegation denied by Abu Dhabi.

The video of Sheikh Abdullah bin Ali Al Thani, a little-known ruling family member until the boycott of Qatar by four Arab nations, offered new fuel to the monthslong stalemated crisis. It immediately recalled the bizarre, now-reversed resignation of Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri while on a trip Riyadh, a Nov. 4 decision that was widely perceived as Saudi-orchestrated at the time.

The UAE's state-run WAM news agency later said Sheikh Abdullah had freely left the country "at his request."

The video, immediately aired by Doha-based news network Al-Jazeera, shows Sheikh Abdullah saying he was invited to Abu Dhabi as a guest of "Sheikh Mohammed." Sheikh Abdullah appears to refer to Abu Dhabi's powerful crown prince, Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, who enjoys strong ties to Saudi Arabia's rulers.

"I am a guest of Sheikh Mohammed but it is not hosting now, it is now an imprisonment," Sheikh Abdullah says. "They told me not to leave and I am afraid something will happen to me and they blame Qatar."

He adds: "I just wanted to let you know that Qatar is innocent in this and I am being hosted by Sheikh Mohammed and anything that happens to me after this is under his responsibility."

The UAE, one of four countries boycotting Qatar, denied the claim. Authorities pointed to a series of tweets by Ali Rashid al-Nuaimi, who heads Abu Dhabi's Hedayah counter-extremism center. Al-Nuaimi said that Sheikh Abdullah had asked to move to the Emirates for his "safety."

"A trusted source confirmed to me that Sheikh Abdullah bin Ali Al Thani is free to leave the UAE for any destination he chooses and he can leave whenever he likes," al-Nuaimi wrote on Twitter, without elaborating.

The report on the WAM news agency said Sheikh Abdullah was "free in his movements" while in the UAE.

"He expressed his desire to leave the country where all procedures were facilitated without any interference," WAM said. It did not say where the sheikh went.

Doha promised to "closely" observe the situation, though it acknowledges it is limited by the boycott, Qatar Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Lolwa al-Khater said.

"We have observed in the past similar behavior by the blockading nations where rights of individuals and officials alike are violated in total contravention of international norms, conventions and laws with no clear purpose or valid reasoning," she said in a statement.

Sheikh Abdullah's grandfather, father and brother were rulers of Qatar until a palace coup ousted his branch of the ruling family in 1972. His last position in government was as head of the equestrian and camel racing federation decades ago.

Since the crisis, Sheikh Abdullah has held high-profile visits with Saudi King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Those meetings came as Riydah allowed Qataris pilgrims over the border in August for hajj, a pilgrimage required of every able-bodied Muslim once in their lives.

Saudis then began suggesting Sheikh Abdullah should rule Qatar as an emir in exile, while Saudi-funded television networks provided him coverage. A quickly created Twitter account in his name amassed hundreds of thousands of followers. However, the last tweet on the account came in October and Sheikh Abdullah has not been publicly seen for some time.

Sheikh Abdullah is one of several Qataris exiles to emerge amid the diplomatic crisis, which began June 5 with Bahrain, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the UAE cutting off Doha's land, sea and air routes over its alleged support of extremists and close ties to Iran. Qatar has long denied funding extremists and recently restored full diplomatic relations with Iran, with whom it shares a massive offshore natural gas field that made the country and its 250,000-odd citizens extremely wealthy.

The UAE and Saudi Arabia have cultivated even-closer ties in recent years. Emirati troops are deeply involved in the Saudi-led war in Yemen. Sheikh Mohammed of Abu Dhabi is believed to have a close relationship with Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. The two countries announced plans of forming a tighter relationship in December, helping torpedo an already troubled meeting of the Gulf Cooperation Council.

The U.S., which has some 10,000 troops stationed at Qatar's sprawling al-Udeid Air Base as part of its campaign against the Islamic State group and the war in Afghanistan, has sought to end the crisis. Its military has halted some regional exercises to put pressure on the GCC, which includes Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the UAE, to resolve the crisis. However, President Donald Trump in the meantime made comments seemingly supporting the Arab nations' efforts at isolating Qatar, complicating those efforts.

A Trump-prompted call in September between Qatar's ruling emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, and the Saudi crown prince that offered a chance at negotiations also broke down in mutual recriminations.

———

Associated Press writer Fay Abuelgasim contributed to this report.

———

Follow Jon Gambrell on Twitter at www.twitter.com/jongambrellap . His work can be found at http://apne.ws/2galNpz .

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World

Iran oil tanker explodes, sinks off China with no survivors

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Iran oil tanker explodes, sinks off China with no survivors

The Associated Press
Friends and colleagues of the deceased Iranian seafarers aboard a tanker that sank off the coast of China weep at the headquarters of National Iranian Tanker Company, in Tehran, Iran, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. The burning Iranian tanker listing for days off the coast of China after a collision with another vessel sank Sunday, with an Iranian official saying there was "no hope" of survival for the 29 missing sailors onboard. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

A burning Iranian oil tanker exploded and sank Sunday after more than a week listing off the coast of China, as an Iranian official acknowledged there was "no hope" of missing sailors surviving the disaster.

The collision and disaster of the Sanchi, which carried 30 Iranians and two Bangladeshis, had transfixed an Iran still reeling from days of protests and unrest that swept the country at the start of the year.

Families of the sailors wept and screamed at the headquarters of the National Iranian Tanker Co. in Tehran, the private company that owns the Sanchi. Some needed to be taken by ambulance to nearby hospitals as they were so overwhelmed by the news.

"Thirty-two people died without a funeral and without coffins! They burned to ashes while their families were wailing here!" cried out one woman who didn't give her name. The government "has come after 10 days to sympathize with them? What sympathy are you talking about?"

State TV earlier quoted Mahmoud Rastad, the chief of Iran's maritime agency, as saying: "There is no hope of finding survivors among the (missing) 29 members of the crew."

President Hassan Rouhani expressed his condolences and called on relevant government agencies to investigate the tragedy and take any necessary legal measures, according to state TV. In a message, Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei expressed his condolences and sympathy with the victims' families, his own website, Khamenei.ir, reported Sunday. The government also announced Monday as a nationwide day of public mourning over the disaster.

The cause of the Jan. 6 collision between the Sanchi and the Chinese freighter CF Crystal, 257 kilometers (160 miles) off the coast of Shanghai, remains unclear. The CF Crystal had 21 crew members, all of whom were reported safe.

But the Sanchi, carrying nearly 1 million barrels of a gassy, ultra-light oil bound for South Korea, burst into flames. Chinese officials blamed poor weather for complicating their rescue efforts. Thirteen ships, including one from South Korea and two from Japan, engaged in the rescue and cleanup effort Saturday, spraying foam in an effort to extinguish the fire.

But around noon Sunday, Chinese state media reported that a large explosion shook the Sanchi, its hull and superstructure completely stripped of paint by the flames. The ship then sank into the sea.

The Chinese say the ship left a 10-square-kilometer (3.8-square-mile) area contaminated with oil. However, the condensate oil the ship was carrying readily evaporates or burns off in a fire, reducing the chance of a major oil spill.

Chinese state media also said the ship's voice data recorder, which functions like "black boxes" on aircraft, had been recovered. Three bodies have been recovered from the sea, leaving 29 crew members still unaccounted for.

The tanker has operated under five different names since it was built in 2008, according to the U.N.-run International Maritime Organization. The National Iranian Tanker Co. describes itself as operating the largest tanker fleet in the Middle East.

It's the second collision for a ship from the National Iranian Tanker Co. in less than a year and a half. In August 2016, one of its tankers collided with a Swiss container ship in the Singapore Strait, damaging both ships but causing no injuries or oil spill.

———

Associated Press writers Jon Gambrell in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, and Mohammad Nasiri contributed to this report.

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Turkey vows imminent assault on Kurdish enclave in Syria

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Turkey vows imminent assault on Kurdish enclave in Syria

The Associated Press
Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gestures to supporters of his ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP), at a rally in Bingol, eastern Turkey, Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018. Erdogan has said Turkey will oust Kurdish militants from Afrin, northern Syria, as the military shelled the area from across the border. Turkey considers the YPG a terror group and an extension of the Kurdish insurgency within its own borders. (Pool Photo via AP)

Turkey's president said Sunday the country will launch a military assault on a Kurdish enclave in northern Syria "in the coming days" and urged the U.S. to support its efforts.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said the operation against the Afrin enclave aims to "purge terror" from his country's southern border.

Afrin is controlled by a Syrian Kurdish militia known as the YPG. Turkey considers the YPG to be a terrorist group linked to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) that has waged a bloody insurgency within its borders.

A YPG spokesman in Afrin said clashes erupted after midnight between his unit and Turkish troops near the border with Turkey. Rojhat Roj said the shelling of areas in Afrin district, in Aleppo province, killed one YPG fighter and injured a couple of civilians on Sunday.

Turkey and its Western allies, including the U.S., consider the PKK a terrorist organization. But the U.S. has been arming some of Syria's Kurds to defeat the Islamic State group in Syria — a sore point in already tense U.S.-Turkish relations.

The Turkish president said "despite it all" he wants to work with the U.S. in the region and hopes it will not side with the YPG during the upcoming Afrin operation.

"We expect (the U.S.) to support Turkey in its legitimate efforts" to combat terror, said Erdogan.

Also Sunday, Erdogan's spokesman responded to reports the U.S.-led coalition would establish a 30,000-strong border security force in Syria involving the Kurdish militia as "worrying."

In December, The Associated Press reported that the U.S. was developing an expanded training program for Kurdish and Arab border guards in Syria to prevent the resurgence of IS.

Ibrahim Kalin, the presidential spokesman, said the U.S. was taking steps to legitimize and solidify the YPG. "It's absolutely not possible to accept this," Kalin said and repeated that Turkey would defend itself.

Erdogan said the new operation into Afrin would be an extension of Turkey's 2016 incursion into northern Syria, which aimed to combat IS and stem the advance of U.S.-backed Kurdish forces. Turkish troops are stationed in rebel-held territory on both sides of Afrin.

Roj said the Kurdish militia will fight to "defend our gains, our territories." Senior Kurdish official Hediye Yusuf wrote on Twitter that the Turkish operation against Afrin is a "violation" of the Syrian people and undermines international efforts to reach a political solution in Syria.

The Turkey-PKK conflict has killed an estimated 40,000 people since 1984 and the resumption of hostilities in July 2015 killed more than 3,300 people, including state security forces, militants and civilians.

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Technology

France vs. fake news: An unwinnable battle?

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France vs. fake news: An unwinnable battle?

The Associated Press
The mixing and editing desk at RT France is pictured in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. Russian state broadcaster RT, formerly known as Russia Today, already broadcasts in English, Spanish, and Arabic, and has launched a French-language channel on Dec. 18. French President Emmanuel Macron’s plan for a law against false information around election campaigns is drawing criticism from media advocates, tech experts and others. They say it’s impossible to enforce and smacks of methods used by authoritarians, not democracies. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Can a democratic country outlaw fake news?

France is about to find out, after President Emmanuel Macron ordered a law to quash false information disseminated around electoral campaigns.

Criticism is pouring in from media advocates, tech experts — and Kremlin-backed broadcaster RT. They say the law smacks of authoritarianism, will be impossible to enforce and is sure to backfire.

Macron's stance "could be just the beginning of actually censoring freedom of speech. We believe it is a very dangerous situation," Xenia Fedorova, director of RT's newly launched French-language channel, told The Associated Press.

Yet in a world where a falsehood can now reach billions instantaneously, and political manipulation is increasingly sophisticated, Macron argues something must be done.

A congressional report by U.S. Democrats released Thursday detailed apparent Russian efforts to undermine politics in 19 European countries since 2016, using cyberattacks, disinformation, clandestine social media operations, financing of fringe political groups and, in extreme cases, assassination attempts. Macron's own campaign suffered a big hacking attack last year, though the government later said it found no proof of Russian involvement.

Propaganda and disinformation aren't new or unique to Russia. Author and technology historian Edward Tenner argues that fake news is as old as George Washington's cherry tree — an enduring but untrue legend about the first U.S. president.

While democracies usually rely on defamation and libel laws to combat false publications, Macron wants more.

In a New Year's speech to journalists, he said he's ordering a new "legal arsenal" that would oblige news sites to reveal who owns them and where their money comes from. It could cap the money allowed for content seen as aimed at swaying an election and allow emergency legal action to block websites. The French broadcast regulator's power would expand to allow it to suspend media seen as trying to destabilize a vote — notably those "controlled or influenced by foreign powers."

That probably means outlets such as RT — whose coverage was seen as favoring far-right candidate Marine Le Pen in last year's French election and which many consider a tool of the Russian government — and Sputnik, another Russian-backed outlet that drew attention for reporting a rumor during the French presidential campaign that Macron was having a gay affair.

He denied it, and beat Le Pen anyway, but never forgot.

RT's Fedorova says they are being unfairly targeted. Speaking from RT's gleaming French studios on the banks of the Seine River, she says she struggled to get permits to open in France, and her journalists are routinely barred from the Elysee Palace after Macron accused RT and Sputnik last year of being "organs" of Russian influence.

RT France's coverage appears broadly similar to other French networks, with a slightly greater emphasis on street violence and migrants. The biggest difference: its extensive coverage of Syria, which stresses the views of the Russian and Syrian governments.

"RT stands for giving the floor, the platform to different opinions, and I personally believe that diversity of voices is absolutely necessary in order to have the big picture," said Fedorova, who says RT will be watching Macron's plan closely.

Media freedom watchdog Reporters Without Borders is also watching closely. It has decried fake news as undermining journalists who work hard to uncover wrongdoing and verify information, but the group is wary of Macron's order.

"We are not opposed to the principle of a law against fake news. But the point is to be able to write a law without endangering the freedom to reveal things," the group's chief, Christophe Deloire, told the AP.

"Probably our democracies have to be defended in front of the fake news wave," he said, but not "with the ways that despotic countries use."

His group, also known by French acronym RSF, is working with partners on a potential certification system that could classify news sources according to their verification methods, transparency about financing and other criteria — and leave it up to the public to decide what to believe.

As France's government prepares its bill, it will be learning lessons from a German law that went into effect this month cracking down on hate speech on social networks. Some fear legitimate posts by satirists or journalists are being accidentally caught up in the dragnet.

Shutting down websites can also backfire by calling more attention to them.

"The only long-term solution for the fake news problem is a more sophisticated public," Tenner said.

"Sophisticated manipulators of facts will always find a way around whatever regulations are in place," such as creating a front company to sponsor a website or writing "something that is misleading and inflammatory that is factually true," he said.

Daniel Castro, vice president of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, outlines another problem: "People like fake news. It reinforces their beliefs."

Macron is prompting "a very valid conversation" about campaign funding and transparency. But "where it runs into trouble is when they try to define fake news," he said.

The Macron government's digital affairs chief is lucid about the challenges ahead.

"This is the beginning of the debate. We won't go too fast," Mounir Mahjoubi told the AP.

He insists governments shouldn't remain complacent, especially with elections coming up in Italy, Russia and the U.S., and for the European Parliament next year.

"We need to ask this question," he said, "and work all together on what can be done."

———

David Rising in Berlin and Jona Kallgren in Las Vegas contributed to this report.

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