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Ann Curry on Matt Lauer: ‘I am not surprised by the allegations’

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Ann Curry speaks out about Matt Lauer: 'I am not surprised by the allegations'

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Former "Today" anchor and NBC News correspondent Ann Curry spoke out Wednesday morning about her former co-host Matt Lauer, who was abruptly fired last year following alleged inappropriate sexual behavior.

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In an interview on "CBS This Morning," Curry fielded a handful of very pointed questions. She said she did not want to "do harm" or cause more pain, but she did address the atmosphere at NBC News she said she experienced while working there.

"I can tell you that I am not surprised by the allegations," she said of Lauer. "I can [also] say that I would be surprised if many women did not understand that there was a climate of verbal harassment that existed. I think it would be surprising if someone said they didn't see that. It was verbal sexual harassment."

Read: Ann Curry and Natalie Morales speak out about Matt Lauer's termination Related: Matt Lauer responds to allegations of 'inappropriate sexual behavior' after NBC termination

[email protected] says she is “not surprised” about the allegations against former “TODAY” co-host Matt Lauer. #AnnCurryThisMorning pic.twitter.com/2nPl3By1tS

— CBS This Morning ?? (@CBSThisMorning) January 17, 2018

[email protected]: "We clearly are waking up to a reality and injustice that has been occurring for sometime. I think it will continue to occur until the glass ceiling is finally broken.” #AnnCurryThisMorning pic.twitter.com/naZeguVyNP

— CBS This Morning ?? (@CBSThisMorning) January 17, 2018

Curry added that the movement that is taking place is overdue and has been a long time coming.

"We clearly are waking up to a reality and injustice that's occurred for some time," she said. "This is about power and power imbalance where women are not valued as much as men."

PHOTO: Ann Curry appears on CBS This Morning, Jan. 17, 2018.CBS
Ann Curry appears on "CBS This Morning," Jan. 17, 2018.

The interview on "CBS This Morning" comes a day after the appearance was teased on Twitter.

"TOMORROW on @CBSThisMorning: Former 'TODAY' co-anchor @AnnCurry will join us for her *first* TV interview since leaving NBC in 2015," the tweet read. "She'll discuss her upcoming @PBS show and we'll also ask her about the #MeToo movement and the firing of her former colleague Matt Lauer."

TOMORROW on @CBSThisMorning: Former "TODAY" co-anchor @AnnCurry will join us for her *first* TV interview since leaving NBC in 2015.

She'll discuss her upcoming @PBS show and we'll also ask her about the #MeToo movement and the firing of her former colleague Matt Lauer. pic.twitter.com/j7JLQsTuze

— CBS This Morning ?? (@CBSThisMorning) January 16, 2018

Curry left "Today" in 2012 after a year as a co-anchor and 15 years with the show. She eventually left NBC News a few years later and is currently promoting her PBS docuseries, "We'll Meet Again."

When Lauer's termination from NBC News was announced in November, Curry wouldn't speak specifically to Lauer, but did tell People magazine, "I'm still really processing it," adding more generally that "we need to move this revolution forward and make our workplaces safe."

She also offered support to all women who have come forward with allegations of sexual misconduct.

"I admire the women who have been willing to speak up both anonymously and on the record. Those women need to keep their jobs, and all women need to be able to work, to be able to thrive without fear. This kind of behavior exists across industries, and it is so long overdue for it to stop," she said. "This is a moment when we all need to be a beacon of light for those women, for all women and for ourselves."

Lauer, 60, was fired late last year after the network received "a detailed complaint from a colleague" involving "inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace by Matt Lauer."

Matt Lauer has been terminated from NBC News. On Monday night, we received a detailed complaint from a colleague about inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace by Matt Lauer. As a result, we’ve decided to terminate his employment. pic.twitter.com/1A3UAZpvPb

— TODAY (@TODAYshow) November 29, 2017

As more stories of harassment allegedly involving Lauer began to circulate, he spoke out later in November, saying, "There are no words to express my sorrow and regret for the pain I have caused others by words and actions. To the people I have hurt, I am truly sorry. As I am writing this, I realize the depth of the damage and disappointment I have left behind at home and at NBC."

He continued, "Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterized, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed. I regret that my shame is now shared by the people I cherish dearly. Repairing the damage will take a lot of time and soul-searching, and I'm committed to beginning that effort. It is now my full-time job."

ABC News' Lesley Messer contributed to this report.

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Health

Century after pandemic, science takes its best shot at flu

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Century after pandemic, science takes its best shot at flu

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The descriptions are haunting.

Some victims felt fine in the morning and were dead by night. Faces turned blue as patients coughed up blood. Stacked bodies outnumbered coffins.

A century after one of history's most catastrophic disease outbreaks, scientists are rethinking how to guard against another super-flu like the 1918 influenza that killed tens of millions as it swept the globe.

There's no way to predict what strain of the shape-shifting flu virus could trigger another pandemic or, given modern medical tools, how bad it might be.

But researchers hope they're finally closing in on stronger flu shots, ways to boost much-needed protection against ordinary winter influenza and guard against future pandemics at the same time.

"We have to do better and by better, we mean a universal flu vaccine. A vaccine that is going to protect you against essentially all, or most, strains of flu," said Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health.

Labs around the country are hunting for a super-shot that could eliminate the annual fall vaccination in favor of one every five years or 10 years, or maybe, eventually, a childhood immunization that could last for life.

Fauci is designating a universal flu vaccine a top priority for NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Last summer, he brought together more than 150 leading researchers to map a path. A few attempts are entering first-stage human safety testing.

Still, it's a tall order. Despite 100 years of science, the flu virus too often beats our best defenses because it constantly mutates.

Among the new strategies: Researchers are dissecting the cloak that disguises influenza as it sneaks past the immune system, and finding some rare targets that stay the same from strain to strain, year to year.

"We've made some serious inroads into understanding how we can better protect ourselves. Now we have to put that into fruition," said well-known flu biologist Ian Wilson of The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California.

The somber centennial highlights the need.

Back then, there was no flu vaccine. It wouldn't arrive for decades. Today vaccination is the best protection, and Fauci never skips his. But at best, the seasonal vaccine is 60 percent effective. Protection dropped to 19 percent a few years ago when the vaccine didn't match an evolving virus.

If a never-before-seen flu strain erupts, it takes months to brew a new vaccine. Doses arrived too late for the last, fortunately mild, pandemic in 2009.

Lacking a better option, Fauci said the nation is "chasing" animal flu strains that might become the next human threat. Today's top concern is a lethal bird flu that jumped from poultry to more than 1,500 people in China since 2013. Last year it mutated, meaning millions of just-in-case vaccine doses in a U.S. stockpile no longer match.

———

The NIH's Dr. Jeffery Taubenberger calls the 1918 flu the mother of all pandemics.

He should know.

While working as a pathologist for the military, he led the team that identified and reconstructed the extinct 1918 virus, using traces unearthed in autopsy samples from World War I soldiers and from a victim buried in the Alaskan permafrost.

That misnamed Spanish flu "made all the world a killing zone," wrote John M. Barry in "The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History."

Historians think it started in Kansas in early 1918. By winter 1919, the virus had infected one-third of the global population and killed at least 50 million people, including 675,000 Americans. By comparison, the AIDS virus has claimed 35 million lives over four decades.

Three more flu pandemics have struck since, in 1957, 1968 and 2009, spreading widely but nowhere near as deadly. Taubenberger's research shows the family tree, each subsequent pandemic a result of flu viruses carried by birds or pigs mixing with 1918 flu genes.

"This 100-year timeline of information about how the virus adapted to us and how we adapt to the new viruses, it teaches us that we can't keep designing vaccines based on the past," said Dr. Barney Graham, deputy director of NIH's Vaccine Research Center.

——

The new vaccine quest starts with two proteins, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, that coat flu's surface. The "H'' allows flu to latch onto respiratory cells and infect them. Afterward, the "N'' helps the virus spread.

They also form the names of influenza A viruses, the most dangerous flu family. With 18 hemagglutinin varieties and 11 types of neuraminidase — most carried by birds — there are lots of potential combinations. That virulent 1918 virus was the H1N1 subtype; milder H1N1 strains still circulate. This winter H3N2, a descendent of the 1968 pandemic, is causing most of the misery.

Think of hemagglutinin as a miniature broccoli stalk. Its flower-like head attracts the immune system, which produces infection-blocking antibodies if the top is similar enough to a previous infection or that year's vaccination.

But that head also is where mutations pile up.

A turning point toward better vaccines was a 2009 discovery that, sometimes, people make a small number of antibodies that instead target spots on the hemagglutinin stem that don't mutate. Even better, "these antibodies were much broader than anything we've seen," capable of blocking multiple subtypes of flu, said Scripps' Wilson.

Scientists are trying different tricks to spur production of those antibodies.

In a lab at NIH's Vaccine Research Center, "we think taking the head off will solve the problem," Graham said. His team brews vaccine from the stems and attaches them to ball-shaped nanoparticles easily spotted by the immune system.

In New York, pioneering flu microbiologist Peter Palese at Mount Sinai's Icahn School of Medicine uses "chimeric" viruses — the hemagglutinin head comes from bird flu, the stem from common human flu viruses — to redirect the immune system.

"We have made the head so that the immune system really doesn't recognize it," Palese explained. GlaxoSmithKline and the Gates Foundation are funding initial safety tests.

In addition to working with Janssen Pharmaceuticals on a stem vaccine, Wilson's team also is exploring how to turn flu-fighting antibodies into an oral drug. "Say a pandemic came along and you didn't have time to make vaccine. You'd want something to block infection if possible," he said.

NIH's Taubenberger is taking a completely different approach. He's brewing a vaccine cocktail that combines particles of four different hemagglutinins that in turn trigger protection against other related strains.

———

Yet lingering mysteries hamper the research.

Scientists now think people respond differently to vaccination based on their flu history. "Perhaps we recognize best the first flu we ever see," said NIH immunologist Adrian McDermott.

The idea is that your immune system is imprinted with that first strain and may not respond as well to a vaccine against another.

"The vision of the field is that ultimately if you get the really good universal flu vaccine, it's going to work best when you give it to a child," Fauci said.

Still, no one knows the ultimate origin of that terrifying 1918 flu. But key to its lethality was bird-like hemagglutinin.

That Chinese H7N9 bird flu "worries me a lot," Taubenberger said. "For a virus like influenza that is a master at adapting and mutating and evolving to meet new circumstances, it's crucially important to understand how these processes occur in nature. How does an avian virus become adapted to a mammal?"

While scientists hunt those answers, "it's folly to predict" what a next pandemic might bring, Fauci said. "We just need to be prepared."

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World

Koreas to march under one flag at Olympics

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North and South Korea agree to compete, march together at Olympics

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North and South Korea have agreed to form a joint female ice hockey team and march together at next month’s Winter Olympics, according to a joint statement from the countries released today by the South.

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The Koreas said their teams would walk together at the opening ceremony under a “Korean Peninsula flag.” South Korea is hosting the Games next month in the city of Pyeongchang.

Officials from both nations plan to meet with the International Olympic Committee in Switzerland on Saturday about the North’s Olympic participation. The IOC needs to approve their plans but has indicated support for the North’s participation.

The two countries have been holding high-level talks since last week. They met again today at their shared border.

PHOTO: South Korean Vice Unification Minister Chun Hae-sung, center left, talks with the head of North Korean delegation Jon Jong Su during their meeting at Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone in Paju, South Korea, Jan. 17, 2018.South Korean Unification Ministry via AP Photo
South Korean Vice Unification Minister Chun Hae-sung, center left, talks with the head of North Korean delegation Jon Jong Su during their meeting at Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone in Paju, South Korea, Jan. 17, 2018.

North Korea to send 230-member cheering squad to Olympics North and South Korea hold new round of talks centered on Olympics

The Koreas said in the statement that their National Olympic Committees would discuss which Olympic events North Korean athletes would participate in and how many would attend.

North Korea also plans to send a 230-member cheering squad that will root for athletes from both countries, the statement said.

PHOTO: The head of North Korean delegation Jon Jong Su, left, and South Korean Vice Unification Minister Chun Hae-sung, right, as they arrived for their meeting to continue their discussions on Olympics cooperation, Jan. 17, 2018. South Korea Unification Ministry via AP Photo
The head of North Korean delegation Jon Jong Su, left, and South Korean Vice Unification Minister Chun Hae-sung, right, as they arrived for their meeting to continue their discussions on Olympics cooperation, Jan. 17, 2018.

Moreover, the North will send around 30 Taekwondo demonstrators who will perform in Pyeongchang and Seoul, the countries said.

The North Korean delegation will travel by train, with the athletes arriving on Feb. 1. The Olympics start Feb. 9.

Before the start of the Games, the two countries will hold a joint cultural event at Mt. Kumgang in North Korea, the statement said.

If the teams do march together next month, it will not be the first time they walk together under a joint flag. They did so at the opening ceremonies of the 2000, 2004 and 2006 Olympics as well.

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Health

3 complementary natural remedies for the flu

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3 complementary natural remedies for the flu

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With flu season in full swing, "Good Morning America" looked into some natural, and complementary, remedies for flu symptoms that may offer some relief if you or a family member has fallen ill this year.

Late last week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that it believes the nation reached peak flu season, and that the disease was considered to be an epidemic based on its medical impact, as hospitalizations across the country soared.

Alabama woman breaks down over husband’s harrowing flu battle that left him in medically induced coma Flu now considered epidemic in US as hospitalizations climb during peak season

ABC News' chief medical correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton appeared live on "GMA" today to break down how to use three well-researched, complementary natural remedies for flu symptoms.

Getting a flu vaccine, however, still remains the best protection for you and your family against the flu, according to Ashton. She also recommends talking to your pediatrician before trying any of these remedies on children.

In addition, peer-reviewed, evidence-based data currently does not recommend any complementary natural remedies as a first line protection against, or as a treatment for, the flu, according to Ashton. Ashton also said it is important to note that natural does not always mean safe when it comes to medical treatments.

1. Oil of oregano

PHOTO: Oil of oregano is believed to be a remedy for the flu. Stock/Getty Images
Oil of oregano is believed to be a remedy for the flu.

Oregano oil, also known as P73, has been shown in small lab studies to have antiviral, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.

To use oil of oregano, simply drop three to 20 drops of it into a glass of water four times a day, swish the concoction around in your mouth, and then swallow.

2. Olive leaf capsules

In a 2010 study published in the medical journal Scientia Pharmaceutica, this extract was described as having antiviral properties to the respiratory viruses R.S.V. and parainfluenza, although it has not yet been proven to be effective against influenza.

Studies about its effect on treating influenza, however, are currently being conducted, mainly looking at olive leaf's major ingredient, oleuropein.

3. Black elderberry extract

Black elderberry extract, which is available in tea, liquid and capsule form, is thought to work by blocking the flu proteins called hemagglutinin, according to Ashton.

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World

China planning to send robot sub to sunken ship

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China planning to send robot sub to sunken ship

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China is preparing to send a robot submarine possibly followed by divers to explore and plug holes in a sunken Iranian oil tanker whose 32 crew members are all believed to have died, the Transport Ministry said Wednesday.

No timeline was given from the deployment, although the Shanghai Maritime Search and Rescue Centre and a Hong Kong newspaper said authorities will send larger salvage vessels to support the operation.

They said divers might also be able to pump out oil from the 85,000-ton vessels' fuel tanks before they leak and contaminate the seabed.

China said that the Sanchi was lying under 115 meters (377 feet) of water in the East China Sea. It caught fire after colliding with a freighter on Jan. 6 and exploded and sunk on Sunday about 530 kilometers (330 miles) southeast of Shanghai.

The report said that an oil slick 58 square kilometers (22 square miles) in size from its cargo of natural gas condensate is being monitored for potential environmental damage with cleanup efforts being organized.

The cause of the collision remains under investigation. All 21 crew members of the freighter were reported safe.

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World

New Hampshire man vanishes during swim in Guatemalan lake

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New Hampshire man vanishes during swim in Guatemalan lake

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WATCH New Hampshire man vanishes during swim in Guatemalan lake

Justin Booska is an avid swimmer. So much so, his brother said, that he used to routinely paddle in his parents' pond to rivers and lakes wherever he roamed.

That's why when Justin Booska mysteriously vanished earlier this month while attempting to swim across a crater lake in Guatemala, Benjamin Booska couldn't believe it.

"He's an athlete and a very strong swimmer," Benjamin Booska told ABC News in a phone interview from his Denver home.

Justin Booska, 27, has been missing since Jan. 6. He was with friends in Santa Rosa enjoying a beach day at Laguna de la Arza.

PHOTO: Justin Booska, left, is pictured with his brother Ben Booska in an undated handout image.From the Hip Photo
Justin Booska, left, is pictured with his brother Ben Booska in an undated handout image.

Booska was "hanging on the beach" on the north side of the area and took a dip to "get to the south side" where he believed a coffee plantation was, his brother said.

The waters of the lake, Benjamin said, are not known to be turbulent.

"It's not known for strong tides," Benjamin added. "It's all fresh water, no predators — it's calm."

As Justin was "most of the way across" to the other side of the lake, Benjamin said, a boat carrying one of his friend's relatives headed out to "check on him and make sure he wasn't hungry."

And Justin, Benjamin learned later, gave no signs he was in any distress.

"He waved back that he was okay," he said.

Somewhere between 3 and 5 p.m. local time, Benjamin said Justin's friend and his family realized he was nowhere to be found.

"His friend alerted local authorities…they got a hold of my parents," he said.

PHOTO: Justin Booska of New Hampshire is pictured on a missing poster released by his family.Booska Family
Justin Booska of New Hampshire is pictured on a missing poster released by his family.

A local firefighting brigade was dispatched and a search party began that night and into Sunday around the lake and the feral land around it.

The response swelled with police, soldiers in the military, drones, a helicopter and dive teams, all directed with efforts by both the Guatemalan and U.S. embassies.

Back home, Justin Booska as a child attended the prestigious Holderness boarding school before going to Brandeis University, where he graduated with a degree in women and gender studies.

The outgoing traveler stayed local for a while advocating for women who suffered from domestic violence, his brother said.

Recently, Justin shifted gears and tended bar at a local tavern in Waltham, Massachusetts, and worked as a representative to a microbrewery, his older brother said.

It also meant more time and energy to travel, even though his brother said he was frugal.

"He wanted to live life and had always been interested in South and Central America," Benjamin said.

His disappearance has drawn interest from many supporters, including New Hampshire Congresswoman Carole Shea-Porter.

“I was heartbroken to learn that Justin is missing in Guatemala," she said in a statement. "I am praying for his safe return, and I am thinking of him and his family every day. This search must continue, and I will do everything that I can to make sure that it does.”

The U.S. State Department, too, said it has been briefed on Booska's disappearance.

"When a U.S. citizen is reported missing overseas, we cooperate with search efforts by local authorities," an official said in a statement. "We stand ready to provide appropriate assistance to U.S. citizens in need."

Beyond the reach of diplomats and public servants, Guatemalan locals have also dedicated whatever they can to track down Justin.

"There was one lady and she had seven Guatemalan dollars, and that was all she had and she gave it up to help find my brother," he said.

A local newspaper, Prensa Libre, reported that volunteer firefighters had still been looking for Booska at least eight days after his disappearance.

PHOTO: Guatemalas Laguna de Ayarza is pictured in an undated satellite image from Google Maps. Google Maps
Guatemala's Laguna de Ayarza is pictured in an undated satellite image from Google Maps.

The family has started a crowdfunding campaign to keep the effort going to recover Justin, and repay that woman and others who have made it their mission to find him.

"We want to help these Guatemalan firefighters and the community there that are dedicating themselves to finding Justin," Benjamin Booska said. "Whatever money is not used in the search will go to the local Guatemalan community… to help them get back to where they were before the search.

"And get them ready for it if this ever happens again."

And his parents are preparing to head to Guatemala to help find their youngest son and not give up on the chance that Justin is still alive.

"We hope he made it to the other side and he fell and hurt himself and couldn't extricate himself from that situation," Benjamin said. "That he couldn't help himself."

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Technology

Trump health report called out as fake news on late-night circuit

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Trump's 'excellent' health report called out as fake news on late-night TV circuit

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Comedians took aim at President Donald Trump’s doctor on Tuesday after he said the president’s "overall health is excellent," according to his recent physical assessment.

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Dr. Ronny Jackson shared the outcome of Trump's exam at a White House press briefing on Tuesday afternoon, including his 6-foot-3 height and 239-pound weight, which puts him right on the brink of obesity.

“That’s awfully convenient,” Stephen Colbert, host of “The Late Show,” said Thursday in his opening monologue, before going on to insinuate that Trump may have bribed the doctor with cash.

Dr. Ronny Jackson: “Heart exam is normal.”

So despite all evidence, Donald Trump does have a heart. #LSSC pic.twitter.com/TKKHaqGchJ

— The Late Show (@colbertlateshow) January 17, 2018

"Listen, Doc, I don’t want to be obese, but I feel like this wad of cash is about one pound. Why don't you take this off my hands and weigh me again, OK," Colbert said in his best Trump impersonation.

Jimmy Kimmel also opened “Live” with a few jokes on the president’s weight.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump and Melania Trump pass out food and meet people impacted by Hurricane Harvey during a visit to the NRG Center in Houston, Sept. 2, 2017.Susan Walsh/AP
President Donald Trump and Melania Trump pass out food and meet people impacted by Hurricane Harvey during a visit to the NRG Center in Houston, Sept. 2, 2017.

“Despite the fact that he is borderline obese, Trump is in excellent health. How could he be in excellent health? When he sneezes gravy comes out. Look at him,” Kimmel joked.

“The doctor said the is examination went exceptionally well, which means he stopped eating chicken long enough to get a reading,” Kimmel added, referring to Trump’s reported love of junk food.

Over on “The Daily Show,” host Trevor Noah said he still had a few questions about the health report.

Tonight at 11/10c, Trump's doctor finds no heart problems, no dementia, and no dentures. But did he test for racism? pic.twitter.com/KCpbYze9To

— The Daily Show (@TheDailyShow) January 17, 2018

“So it turns out, according to the official White House doctor, Trump is completely sane, which makes me more worried because that means he's doing all of this s–t on purpose,” Noah said. “You covfefe in your normal mind?

“No heart problems, no dementia, no dentures? But did you test for racism,” he asked sarcastically.

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